WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Sat - 20.12.2014


platforms

Nieman Journalism Lab spotlighted New York startup NewsCred as a potential online solution to the newspaper publishing industry’s difficulties.

NewsCred, which launched in 2008 as a service combining algorithms and user voting to filter through news content, changed course in 2010 by creating a platform for publishers to create online newspapers, as previously reported.

In November 2011, NewsCred raised US$4 million in venture capital to redesign their service as a digital newswire for publishers, Gigaom.com reported. NewsCred now provides filtered content for more than 750 clients, including Forbes and The Guardian, the article said.

Author

Gianna Walton's picture

Gianna Walton

Date

2012-03-15 11:50

by Jeff Sonderman

A couple weeks ago I predicted that Apple's virtual Newsstand for iPads and iPhones would provide "a little more convenience for the user, and a little more discoverability for the publisher -- but nothing here is a game-changer."

I stand by the first part of that diagnosis, but it's now clear there is something game-changing about Newsstand. Since Apple launched it last week in the latest version of its iOS operating system, its impact has been immediate and significant. Many Newsstand apps now rank among the top free apps overall, and magazine and newspaper apps are benefiting from a surge of downloads and subscribers.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-10-24 17:22

RealNetworks is planning to launch a service in the first quarter of 2011 that would allow users to access content and move it to and from various devices, such as from their PCs, smartphones, tablets and maybe even televisions, ZDNet reported today.

Users would pay for the "media cloud service" monthly, and the service would use Amazon Web Services to store content.

"The media cloud service would allow you to see, access and get content on multiple phones and screens," RealNetworks CEO Robert Kimball told ZDNet. "It would be a master library of your digital life."

The company is scheduled to present at the Maxim Group Growth Conference in New York tomorrow.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-17 21:09

Being able to buy an issue or subscription on one device, and then access it across devices makes sense for device and app users. And, for the most part, it also makes sense for the makers of gadgets - Apple, Amazon, and others. However, it doesn't make sense for publishers looking to sell their own multi-platform subscriptions, paidContent's Staci Kramer wrote yesterday.

It is in the publisher's best interest to control their customer relationships and their brands across devices. Amazon announced its vision is to allow customers to "buy once, read everywhere" - a stance that could lead to content creators locking horns with device-makers.

Image via Melville House Publishing

For example, Kramer writes: "The NYT has invested considerable resources in an iPad app that eventually will be part of its metered plans. Selling subscriptions on the Kindle or Nook makes sense. Selling one that works on an iPad and competes with that, not so much."

Amazon has also said that in the future, it will allow users to lend e-books on the Kindle for 14 days, depending on the publisher's discretion, Retail Digital reported today.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-26 23:58

The James Beard Journalism awards, known to many as the "Oscars of the food world," will no longer differentiate by platform and will instead determine categories by content only, CNN reported today. Nominations for content, despite the medium through which they appear, begin Friday, according to The New York Times.

"Why? Because we cracked a window ... and noticed it was 2010 outside," wrote Kat Kinsman, who is also on the committee that oversees the awards, for CNN's Eatocracy section. "This is not a dance on the grave of print publication. Despite economically challenging times, staffing cuts and the competition posed by the immediacy and accessibility of online journalism, both magazines and newspapers continue to produce vital, vibrant, resonant journalism. Rather, this is an acknowledgment that online contributions should no longer be relegated to the kids' table. Many of the same journalists who originally crafted their careers from ink and paper have found that the impact of their words and images are not lessened - and in fact can often be enhanced and delivered to a wider audience - via digital distribution."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-14 23:00

Boston.com has chosen to deploy a content recommendation platform from Outbrain, a New York-based company to increase traffic and boost revenues on its news site, while enhancing readers' experiences, Editor & Publisher reported.

Through deployment of this new content recommendation tool, the news site will provide "related links" and automatically alert readers to additional stories that maybe of interest to them at the end of each article, according to a press release posted on MarketWatch.com. The Outbrain's technology uses complex set of algorithms to identify and serve up stories targeting different audience segments, while helping readers find relevant new stories at ease with simple related links.

"We're always looking for cost-effective and innovative ways to increase user engagement across our Web site while providing the highest quality experience for our audience," Vice President of Products Bob Kempf told E&P. "This is a sophisticated way to refer readers to content and enhance their experience on the site." Some paid recommended links from third-party publishers will also be available.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-10-07 22:11

The Independent has switched over its blog publishing platform from LiveJournal to WordPress, in an effort to "raise standards," Journalism.co.uk reported yesterday.

This move by the newspaper follows the recent introduction of Disqus system on its website to improve its comments system, by requesting the real names of commentators, according to Journalism.co.uk. The new-look blog bears resemblance to its website and the blogs from independent journalists, columnists and group blogs are now more closely integrated.

"The blogs are built with a standard WordPress system, incorporating our Disqus comments. We are demonstrating that globally standard programs can free mainstream journalism from the complex bespoke set-ups of the past," Martin King, online editor of Independent told Journalism.co.uk.

The WordPress platform allows only in-house or invited bloggers to use their journal profiles and post comments or entries on the blog channel, as in contrary to the Live Journal platform that facilitated access to all readers. As a part of the new set up, new blogs have been added that include The Foreign Desk, Sports, Arts and Notebook. Blog updates from standalone journalists on the Independent Minds site are aggregated and they can now update their blogs via e-mail as well.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-06-09 20:43

German tech corporation Neofonie GmbH announced the launch of an iPad "rival," The Associated Press reported yesterday. The WePad might be better, the corporation claims, because of its larger screen as well as USB ports to connect exterior devices.

Neofonie mentioned that the machine might interest publishers because it would permit them to sell content without forcing a customer relationship (like Apple's iTunes or Amazon's Kindle do) so as to preserve the "simple content supplier" status, the AP wrote.

The WePad is extensible as well as open, since its Linux alternative is compatible with Flash and Java while its "meta-store" allows access to Android Marketplace and other application stores, paidContent reported today. Gadgetvenue.com disclosed that the device will operate on Google's Android operating system.

Neofonie will include its digital newspaper WeMagazine and a magazine platform. German magazine publisher Gruner & Jahr hopes to feature its titles on the WePad and conversations are underway between Neofonie and prominent German publishing group Axel Springer, paidContent added.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-04-13 17:15

A meeting conducted at The New York Times last week seemed to further prove to many people that the Apple Tablet does or will exist, when Executive Editor Bill Keller hypothetically discussed platforms on which Times content would be delivered in the future. However, it's not clear if Keller is talking based on inside information, or if he's just as convinced as the rest of the media that the Tablet will be unveiled next year, Engadget points out.

"...we need to figure out the right journalistic product to deliver to mobile platforms and devices. I'm hoping we can get the newsroom more actively involved in the challenge of delivering our best journalism in the form of Times Reader, iPhone apps, WAP or the impending Apple slate, or whatever comes after that," Keller said at the off-the-record meeting, a video of which was posted on the Times internal server, and after that, by the Nieman Journalism Lab, Gawker, Engadget and others.

Engadget, which dubbed the Tablet "the most important product that never was," reported that it may have found a photo of the SIM card tray supposedly designed for the Tablet, which is larger than the iPhone's SIM tray.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-26 14:37

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