WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Wed - 17.09.2014


press freedom

Flash quiz: what is the highest-circulation English-language newspaper in the world?

(Hint: Rupert Murdoch doesn’t own it.)

The correct answer, as you are likely aware, is the Times of India, which has a circulation of 4.3 million, and reaches an average of 7.64 million readers with each issue.

While money may not exactly be growing on trees in the news industry these days, the 174-year-old title, published by family-owned media conglomerate Bennett, Coleman & Company (B.C.C.L.), is planted in fertile soil: it is the most widely read English-language daily in a country where newspaper circulation is rising by 8 percent per year overall, and 1.5 percent per year for English-language newspapers.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-10-22 18:34

News websites in the US and the UK racked up record traffic numbers in August, traditionally a slow month, according to a report on Poynter.

Advertising revenues continued to decline for US newspapers in the second quarter of this year. Erik Sass of MediaDailyNews reports that the latest figures from the Newspaper Association of America show total ad revenues dropped 6.4 percent to $5.6 billion in the second quarter of 2012 from $6 billion in the second quarter of 2011. "Print ad revenues fell 7.9 percent from $5.2 billion to $4.8 billion, while online ad revenue growth remained anemic with a 2.9 percent increase from $803 million to $827 million," Sass writes.

Does the Los Angeles Times qualify as a charity case? asks veteran blogger Alan D. Mutter, who examines the paper's recent $1 million gift from the Ford Foundation.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-06 18:37

The government of Burma has taken a major step towards freedom of expression according to a report from The Associated Press and published on the Guardian's website. The country has stopped the practice of requiring reporters to submit their articles to state censors before they can be published.

Rachel McAthy on the journalism.co.uk website offers an interesting look at eight examples of long-form digital content projects.

Recovering Journalist Mark Potts highlights a vision for the future of newspaperwritten 20 years ago by Robert G. Kaiser, the then-newly appointed Managing Editor of The Washington Post, which as Potts points out, remains "a striking document, even today."

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-08-20 19:19

Roy Greenslade reports that a website editor in Belarus has been arrested for publishing photos of teddy bears pinned with press freedom messages, which were air-dropped into the country earlier this month by the Swedish Ad Agency Studio Total. See our earlier report on the airdrop here.

Time Inc. Sports Group, which publishes Sports IllustratedSI Kids and Golf, is reducing its editorial staff by 16 people, mainly through “voluntary departures,” according to AdWeek.

The Telegraph says a group of major News Corporation investors is seeking to have Rupert Murdoch removed as chairman during the company's annual general meeting in October.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-07-19 19:59

By Umar Cheema

There couldn’t have been a greater admission. Pakistani Prime Minister Yousaf Raza Gillani recently told journalists that running government is not an easy job under the watch of a critical media. His remarks are dictated by personal experience.

Mr. Gillani is running a government rocked by corruption scandals. His family is not immune either. Two of the PM’s sons—both lawmakers—have been implicated in mega scams. He himself faces contempt of court charges for not proceeding against President Asif Ali Zardari who allegedly stashed huge amounts of money in Swiss banks. Mr. Gillani’s close advisors also face court trials on corruption allegations.

In the foreign press, Pakistan receives negative coverage due to terrorism-related reports. Inside the country, people are more concerned about rampant corruption, one of the key reasons behind a disaffected population turning to militancy. “There are seven days in a week but Islamabad manages to produce eight scandals a week,” writes Dr. Farrukh Saleem, an economist. The more information that is transmitted to the public, the further frustration it spreads, resulting in stimulating debates about the accountability of the government.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-03 16:43

Spain’s economy and the newspaper industry have both been under pressure in recent years, to put it mildly. But now, in the opinion of the Spanish Federation of Journalists' Associations (FAPE), a crisis point has been reached. FAPE writes that 97% of its 20,000 journalist members are preparing to protest against threats to their industry on World Press Freedom Day on May 3, under the slogan “Without journalists, there is no journalism, without journalism, there is no democracy”.

FAPE members are preparing to “denounce the difficult situation that journalism is going through” in 41 cities across Spain, and the association is calling on the public to support its rallies.

According to FAPE, 6,234 journalists have been laid off since the financial crisis hit in 2008, 57 media organisations have been closed, and 23 have introduced redundancies. FAPE president Elsa González has blamed media executives for the industry’s current problems, and has accused them of “opting to dramatically reduce staff numbers without a clear commitment to innovation and training” instead of supporting “journalism adapted to the demands of people living in the 21st century”. 

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-02 14:51

Legal experts and human rights advocates have raised questions about the state of international laws protecting journalists and their sources in the wake of the News of the World phone hacking scandal and the fallout from WikiLeaks publication of classified documents

Speaking at the UNESCO conference The Media World after WikiLeaks and News of the World, Jane Kirtley, director at the University of Minnesota School of Journalism, stated that she was "very nervous" about a number of cases in the United States, which she saw as laying a ground work for greater limits being placed on freedom.

Among the factors that caused her concern were the lack of a federal shield law to protect journalistic sources in the United States, and the recent seizure of the Mega Uploads domain name, despite the fact that it was outside of US jurisdiction.

Agnès Callamard, executive director of Article 19, likewise criticised the US government's reaction to the embassy cable leaks, calling some of the initial reactions reminiscent of the "McCarthy era".

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-16 19:11

After being postponed in September and October, The New Age finally hit the streets of South Africa today.

The national newspaper, owned by the Gupta Group, announced on its front page that coverage will be independent, Agence France-Presse reported. The owner is run by wealthy Indian immigrants who align themselves with the country's ruling party, the African National Congress, and President Jacob Zuma.

Image: Times Live However, the Financial Times has called the newspaper "pro-government," and its launch comes as the protection of information bill is being discussed in parliament. Opponents say the bill, if signed into law, could prevent the media and even politicians from holding the government accountable.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-12-07 00:13

A bill that would create harsher punishments for those who attack journalists has been submitted to the lower house of the country's parliament, Russian news agency RIA Novosti reported. However, the legislation is "not enough," said lawmaker Irina Yarovaya.

Earlier this month, two journalists were violently attacked in Moscow. Oleg Kashin was beaten outside of his home and had to be put into an induced coma, and Anatoly Adamchuk was attacked two days later, according to Journalism.co.uk.

Photo via RIA Novosti: Oleg Kashin, a reporter for Kommersant, was beaten outside his home earlier this month.
Russia has one of the worst safety records for journalists in the world, ranked fifth, behind Iraq, the Philippines, Colombia and Mexico, according tot he International Press Institute. At least 35 journalists were murdered in Russia between 2000 and 2009, RIA Novosti noted.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-30 17:57

Newspapers are generally regarded for their roles in societies as giving citizens a tool to better monitor their governments and other officials, and pushing for progress and promoting free speech. One newspaper in Uganda, operating on the opposite end of the spectrum, has been ordered to stop publishing the names of citizens it says are gay, according to a Reuters report, posted yesterday by the Irish Times.

The newspaper, called Rolling Stone, last month published the names and photos of citizens it said were homosexual, and called on authorities to put them to death. The headline was called "Men of Shame Part II," and followed the publication last month of 100 other people it alleged were gay.

Image: AP, via the Guardian

The Sexual Minorities Uganda group petitioned the country's high court to close the publication, as it was opening up innocent people to discrimination at the least, and violence at the worst, Frank Mugisha, chairman of the group, told Reuters.

Under Ugandan law, homosexuality is outlawed. Several people in the list published by Rolling Stone experienced harassment, according to the Guardian.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-02 17:32

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