WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Tue - 23.12.2014


print newspaper

by Jack Shafer

A little over five years ago, I announced that I was canceling my subscription to the New York Times. My cancellation wasn't in protest of Times coverage of the Middle East, ethnic minorities, religion, sex, or any of the other thousand hot-button issues that cause readers to kill their subscriptions. I was getting rid of my newsprint New York Times because the dandy redesign of NYTimes.com had made it a superior vessel for conveying the news.

Continue reading on Slate

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-08-24 17:28

Betting the future of The Guardian on print would have been "truly reckless", according to editor Alan Rusbridger.

Writing exclusively in the July edition of Press Gazette magazine, Rusbridger insisted the shift to a "digital future" did not mean The Guardian was turning its back on print, pointing out that its most of its revenues still come from its print edition.

Continue reading on Press Gazette

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-06-30 09:28

The future of content appears to lie in the complex world of embracing all storytelling forms. New research suggests that multi-channel content distribution and marketing of both print and digital products are essential for reaching consumers who are now consuming both in nearly equal amounts.

Continue reading on Newspaper Next

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-06-20 09:33

The media joint venture of Avusa Media and Pearson, BDFM announced plans to discontinue publication of its "Big News for the Business Owner" newspaper soon, according to a report by MediaUpdate.co.za yesterday.

"Closing Big News does not mean the company has lost faith in the small business market; it is just that, perhaps, under the circumstances, Big News had the odds stacked against it," BDFM managing director Mzi Malunga was quoted as saying by BizCommunity.com. "I would like to take this opportunity to pay tribute to the hard working Big News team, especially its editor, Samantha Kalisa."

Since its launch in 1996, the South African newspaper has been providing a voice to small and medium business owners, while helping them grow their businesses and create jobs. It has also been a part of the BDFM media brands that include titles such as Business Day, the Financial Mail, Summit TV and The Home Channel, MediaUpdate.co.za reported yesterday.

Around 80,000 copies of the newspaper have been distributed monthly, BizCommunity.com reported. Malunga further added that the "details of the newspaper's winding-down process will be communicated to the rest of the business in coming weeks."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-11-16 16:21

Considering the shift in consumer preferences toward digital content, many newspapers and magazines have been combating steady declines in circulations and decreasing print ad revenues for quite sometime. The U.S News Media Group, publishers of U.S. News & World Report, will discontinue publishing print editions of the news weekly after the December issue, which will be the last print edition sent out to all subscribers, Bloomberg.com reported last week.

Being among the topmost three news weeklies in United States after Time and Newsweek, the media group management informed in a memo to staffers about the transition to a predominantly digital publishing model with selected, single-topic print issues, Poynter.org reported.

This shift to the digital only medium will not result in more layoffs, Brian Kelly, editor of the weekly news magazine assured, CBCCanada reported. While most of the news content will be available for free on the news site, Bill Holiber, president of the U.S. News Media Group, said the move "allows us to continue to grow our online business and to take advantage of the emerging platforms for distributing information."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-11-08 18:18

Ross Dawson, chairman of media industry analysts Future Exploration Network, predicts that newspapers in the United Kingdom will be "extinct" by 2019, as the job newspapers do will be transitioned to other channels, The Drum reported today. According to Dawson, print editions of papers will cease to exist by the end of the decade in some countries but will survive past 2040 in others.

Of course, Dawson isn't the first to predict the demise of print. And, as MediaGuardian's Roy Greenslade pointed out: "Anyone who has dared to put a date to the disappearance of newsprint has, naturally enough, suffered from much scorn."

Image via RossDawson.com

Dawson's Newspaper Extinction Timeline suggests that in the United States, print will die out by 2017. In the UK and Iceland, print may live up to 2019. Newspapers in their "current form" might become "irrelevant" in Canada and Norway in 2020. A significant part of Europe may see the demise of newsprint by 2030, he states.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-11-01 23:31

Although two thirds of Americans prefer to get their news from newspapers and TV, 55 percent believe that traditional media "will not longer exist in ten years," according to a Harris poll conducted for 24/7 Wall St. website, Editor & Publisher revealed on Friday.

However, 81 percent said there "will always be" a need for print newspapers despite the decline of traditional print outlets. Yet, 46 percent get their news from local TV networks while only 31 percent turns their attention towards local dailies, the survey showed.

Photo: Getty Images via The Independent

Twenty-five percent of Americans acknowledged that they are spending less time reading newspapers and magazines, "while in comparison 28 per cent said the time they spend visiting online news sites has increased," Journalism.co.uk reported. Overall, 50 percent get "almost all" their news from the Internet.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-01 14:04

The Independent's new daily i launches today. Billed as the first quality daily to launch in Britain in 25 years, it aims to provide a full news service "in a way that is fully accessible," Independent deputy editor Adam Leigh told the Editors Weblog. It is not a new paper in terms of content, rather will almost entirely consist of repurposed and repackaged Independent content, presented in a new and more concise format. Media commentator for the Guardian Roy Greenslade described it as it as "quite simply, a populist alter ego to the Independent."

"Daily briefing is a phrase that we've used a lot while we've been developing it," said Leigh, who will be specifically involved with i, while the Independent's other deputy editor Dan Gledhill focuses on the main edition of the Independent. However, he stressed, it is more than that; it is "a newspaper first and foremost and it will cover a range of different content for a range of moments throughout the day." Many of the news stories near the front of the paper will only be one paragraph long, but throughout the 56-page paper there will also be longer pieces, or "places to pause," as Leigh put it.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-26 15:58

The Bangkok Post published today a 3D newspaper to celebrate its 64th anniversary, becoming the first daily in Thailand to produce an edition of this kind, The Star reported.

"You may be surprised to find the colors blur into each other in some photos, but you'll be amazed and fascinated when you see them through special 3D viewer glasses distributed free with the newspaper," The Bangkok Post explained in an article published in its front page.

Photo: The daily's front page shows a 3D-picture of a woman looking at Bua Sawan flowers

The special photos are spread through the 40 pages of the English-language daily. However, the text remained in its regular format.

The three-dimensional effect was also applied to the advertisements and to a special section called Our Pride, published in celebration of the newspaper recently winning the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers' (WAN-IFRA) Best Overall Design award in Asia-Pacific and Middle East, the Economic Times revealed.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-08-06 16:19

The New Age is scheduled to begin production in September in South Africa, and The Times of India Group has taken an undisclosed stake in the newspaper, Bloomberg reported yesterday.

The newspaper is being launched by Essop Pahad, former minister in the presidency, and will be published by Bennett Colemen & Co LTD, which publishes The Times of India, according to the Independent Online.
The 32-page broadsheet will have an initial print-run of 170,000 copies, and will be funded by the Gupta Group, the family of which also controls Sahara Computers Ltd.

The new publication will also aim to serve provinces that are seen as having little stability and lacking service delivery, such as the Eastern Cape, Mpumalanga, Limpopo, North West and others, Pahad told the IOL.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-07-23 16:00

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