WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Sun - 26.10.2014


reader demand

First of all, note the evolving language: the term Online Readers is now passé as it morphed into Digital Readers. The shift reflects two trends: a broader range of device types and, in news consumption, the spectacular rise of mobility. Today, we'll focus on a recent set of surveys that quantify these trends. And we'll take a look at their impact on business models and strategies.

Continue reading on Monday Note

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-07-06 10:42

The difficulty with what's "obvious", what anyone can plainly see, is that, in media matters, it's very rarely true. Take just a few examples.

It's obvious that if you buy a bulky Saturday paper, you won't need one on Sunday.

Continue reading on Peter Preston on Press and Broadcasting

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-05-30 18:15

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia (CNN) -- Garum Tesfaye is one of Addis Ababa's "newspaper landlords," a group of entrepreneurs in the Ethiopian capital who rent out papers to people too poor to buy them.

Surrounded by worn-out copies of old newspapers, stacks of gossip magazines and the crisp print of the latest news, Tesfaye sits attentively, checking his watch every now and then.

Continue reading on CNN

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-21 10:21

Top New Zealand newspaper publisher, APN News & Media, has started the year on a positive note, registering readership gains for three key print publications and its flagship website. Nielsen's reader survey shows expanded audiences for the New Zealand Herald and the Herald on Sunday.

Continue reading on the PANPA site

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-02-18 15:26

Newspapers are proving so resilient that the term "dying newspaper industry" will be retired in the next year or two.

Newspapers are still profitable, even in the midst of the most punishing ad drought in memory. Readership is at record levels, despite price hikes imposed by publishers. And web interlopers haven't laid a glove on the industry's status as society's dominant news-gatherer.

Continue reading on moneyville

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-02-14 18:04

The time audiences spend with mainstream media coverage of elections is declining in Australia, The Australian reported today.

When looking at newspaper, television, radio and online, political scientist Sally Young found that some television and newspaper audiences may be migrating online, but the percentage of people saying they use the Internet "many times" for election news rose from 0 percent in 1987 to just 5 percent 20 years later. Specifically in print, the research shows that the number of hard political stories is down, in proportion of total print content; however, some newspapers are doing "much more" online, she said.

Image: Sally Young's book, "How Australia Decides: Election Reporting and the Media" will be published in December

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-29 17:07

Newspapers are generally regarded for their roles in societies as giving citizens a tool to better monitor their governments and other officials, and pushing for progress and promoting free speech. One newspaper in Uganda, operating on the opposite end of the spectrum, has been ordered to stop publishing the names of citizens it says are gay, according to a Reuters report, posted yesterday by the Irish Times.

The newspaper, called Rolling Stone, last month published the names and photos of citizens it said were homosexual, and called on authorities to put them to death. The headline was called "Men of Shame Part II," and followed the publication last month of 100 other people it alleged were gay.

Image: AP, via the Guardian

The Sexual Minorities Uganda group petitioned the country's high court to close the publication, as it was opening up innocent people to discrimination at the least, and violence at the worst, Frank Mugisha, chairman of the group, told Reuters.

Under Ugandan law, homosexuality is outlawed. Several people in the list published by Rolling Stone experienced harassment, according to the Guardian.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-02 17:32

Sports coverage is usually a top draw for readers. News publishers know readers want all the news and information involving their favourite teams - from each player's statistics to what is happening off the field. Many times sports news is related to the ugly truth that win or lose, the result of a sporting event can be acts of racism, violence and more.

How publishers handle their coverage of these sports issues is important well beyond the sports pages, and the new issue of Sport et Citoyenneté (Sport and Citizenship) discusses how news media outlets can give audiences what they want while maintaining top quality coverage - whether it's of an amazing goal or a riot outside a stadium.

"The sports press is not just business, it is a fundamental vehicle between supporters and professionals and a showcase for values," Argentinian football player Lionel Messi wrote to the International Association of Sports Newspapers.

Newspapers around the world rely on sports for revenues and readership, and to get more of both means providing 12 "must have" features on a publication's sports homepage, Stanislas Sabatier, a senior consultant at SapienS&Sapide, told a WAN-IFRA conference earlier this year.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-07-06 18:54

Free newspaper 20 minutes remains the most popular newspaper in Spain with 2.3 million readers, beating traditional national dailies like El Paí­s and El Mundo. However, it has lost 7.12 percent of its readers in the last year, according the Spanish Association for Mass Media Investigation, prnoticias.com reported

But 20 minutes is not the only free newspaper that has lost readers after reducing its circulation. Overall, the readership of free Spanish press, which also includes Diario Qué! and ADN, has decreased by 752,000 readers in the second trimester of 2010, compared to 2009.

Out of the three free dailies, Diario Qué! reported the greatest decline with a loss of 17.93 percent. Meanwhile, ADN's readership decreased by 15.65 percent, prnoticias.com detailed.

According to the report, the losses of the three national freesheets are greater than those suffered by the 10 top paid newspapers, which only lost 180,000 readers.

Regardless of the decline, Diario Qué! remains the third most popular newspaper with 1,547,000 readers, followed by El Mundo (1.329.000), ADN (1,261,000), El Periódico (791.000) and ABC (751.000), 20 minutes noted.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-07-05 23:03

Aiming to make the Huffington Post more interactive and more social network friendly, the news site yesterday introduced "HuffPo Badges" to encourage interaction among readers, mediabistro.com reported today.

So what do the badges do?

Mediabistro's Alex Alvarez explains: "Basically, they function like a cross between Gawker's tiered, 'starred commenter' system and Foursquare badges. HuffPost badges are awarded based on user activity and interactivity, so, for example, those who regularly comment on the site or share stories across social networks like Twitter can receive a 'Superuser' badge. Readers who go through flagging inappropriate comments to feel some modicum of power as they sit in their sad little cubicles all day can earn 'Moderator' badges."
The Huffington Post quietly rolled out the badge system yesterday, and plans to add more badges in the future, according to an announcement on the site.

The move to use badges and try to engage users more through social networking "has helped make us a more dynamic and interesting site, while keeping the conversation more civil. HuffPost Badges highlights and rewards the people who power our growing community," said Arianna Huffington, according to mediabistro.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-04-30 01:09

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