Date

Fri - 18.04.2014


rupert murdoch

If reports in this morning’s Daily Telegraph are accurate, News International’s frosty relationship with Google may be thawing.

After two self-imposed years in the wilderness, quality news titles owned by Rupert Murdoch’s British publishing division could find themselves re-included in Google search results as soon as next month.

The Times and The Sunday Times websites were originally removed from Google’s search index at the same time that paywalls were introduced at the thetimes.co.uk (then timesonline.co.uk), as part of News Int.’s attempts to stop users accessing content for free. Murdoch’s objection to consumers viewing premium content free of charge is no secret, and the media mogul hasn’t pulled any punches in his criticisms of Google’s operating policies.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-26 15:19

The Daily, Rupert Murdoch’s first attempt at producing a digital-only newspaper, has announced that almost a third of its present employees are to be “released.” Rumours of its imminent demise have dogged the title since it was reportedly placed ‘on watch’ in July.

Of the 170 members of staff employed at The Daily, 50 will lose their jobs. The Sports and Opinion sections, which suffered from light traffic levels, will be particularly hit by the cuts as executives aim to reduce expenditure in underperforming departments. A memo sent to employees by Editor-in-Chief Jesse Angelo explained: “Sports reporting will now be provided by content partners, like Fox Sports […] The Daily will no longer have a standalone Opinion section. Opinion pieces and editorials will appear in the news pages, clearly marked, from time to time as appropriate.” Further efficiency measures include “locking the app in portrait mode,” meaning that digital pages will only be available in vertical layout, with no horizontal formatting option.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-01 15:10

It was supposed to herald the start of a digital publishing revolution. Instead Rupert Murdoch’s The Daily, the world’s first digital newspaper designed exclusively for the iPad, is rumoured to be facing closure.

In an article for the New York Observer on the effects of News Corp’s recent cuts, Kat Stoeffel reports on rumours that the digital publication has been put “on watch” and will discover its fate after the US presidential elections on November 6th.

Although as yet unconfirmed, if proven to be true the news is unlikely to come as much of a surprise to those who have been closely following the digital title’s fortunes. The Daily launched on a wave of optimism at the beginning of February last year, introduced by Murdoch himself as the company’s answer to the changing world of journalism: “New times demand new journalism… and a new service edited and designed specifically for new devices. Our challenge is to take the best of traditional journalism…and combine it with the best of contemporary technology.”

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-12 16:54

News Corporation has confirmed that over the next year it will separate its publishing and entertainment companies, after rumours of an impending split began circulating earlier this week. In a memo addressed to staff Rupert Murdoch assures his employees that the decision will see News Corp. separate into “two global leaders in their own right […] as opposed to merely one.”

The new media and entertainment company will include many of News Corp.’s most lucrative interests, such as the broadcasters BskyB, Sky Italia, and Fox Broadcasting, as well as the hugely successful 20th Century Fox Film. Whilst there is little doubt that these businesses will continue to flourish, the same cannot be said of the soon-to-be-annexed newspaper titles. Debate is raging over whether removing the safety-net of profits generated by the entertainment businesses will see the company’s newspapers forced to shape-up, or if the measure will ultimately lead to widespread cost-cutting and titles being sold-off or even closed.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-06-28 18:36

Early on Tuesday morning rumours began to circulate of a possible restructuring within Rupert Murdoch's News Corp, which would see the company separate its entertainment businesses from its smaller section of publishing titles. The rumours are generally seen as credible, having been first published in the News Corp-owned Wall Street Journal. Though the company’s representatives are so far refusing to confirm or deny reports outright, BBC Business editor Robert Preston has been told by a News Corps insider that the company has “nothing to add to [the] WSJ piece”.

The idea of dividing News Corp into two separate organisations is not a new one, having first been suggested several years ago, but until now Murdoch had always rejected such a move. The media mogul seems to have a sentimental attachment to newspapers, that until the 1980s were the nucleus of News Corporation. However, the recent scandals that have engulfed Murdoch-owned titles such as the former News of the World have led shareholders to see splitting the company as an ideal way to protect the company’s film and television interests, including the Fox Broadcasting Network and British Sky Broadcasting, from the problems besieging the company’s UK newspaper titles.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-06-26 15:13

The arrests of five Sun journalists over alleged corrupt payments made to police and public officials have prompted angry responses from sections of the UK press and from the National Union of Journalists.

Sun deputy editor Geoff Webster, chief reporter John Kay, chief foreign correspondent Nick Parker, picture editor John Edwards and deputy news editor John Sturgis were arrested early on Saturday morning and later released on bail.

Trevor Kavanagh at The Sun condemned the arrests in an article today, beginning "The Sun is not a 'swamp' that needs draining". He protested that the paper's journalists are being "treated like members of an organised crime gang" who are "subjects of the biggest police operation in British criminal history".

Kavanagh characterises the ongoing police investigation as "out of proportion", and describes the alleged crimes of the journalists who were arrested as being nothing more than "to act as journalists have acted on all newspapers through the ages, unearthing stories that shape our lives, often obstructed by those who prefer to operate behind closed doors"

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-13 17:03

In the coming weeks, News Corp. is set to unveil one of its more audacious content bets in recent years: The Daily, a newspaper designed for the iPad and the generation of tablet devices it inspired.

Conceived by News Corp. Chairman Rupert Murdoch, who negotiated directly with Apple CEO Steve Jobs, the publication breaks new ground in a couple of ways. First, it's one of the biggest bets on traditional journalism in years on any platform -- 100 writers, editors and designers have been hired for the project -- since Conde Nast sunk $100 million into Portfolio magazine.

Continue reading on the Ad Age site

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-01-18 18:19

Apple and News Corp may be ready to launch The Daily on December 9, according to John Gruber, of Daring Fireball. Apple may also announce subscriptions through iTunes, enabling consumers to receive automatically delivered newspapers and magazines directly to their iPads.

Rupert Murdoch's first tablet-only publication will be launched exclusively as an app for the iPad, and appear later on Android tablets. Its budget is believed to be US$30 million, with a staff of about 100.

Currently, iPad users download and pay for digital issues of a publication one issue at a time, Digital Trends pointed out.

"In addition to this being moderately inconvenient, it also keeps consumer information out of publishers' hands. Which is why, up to this point, publishers haven't warmed to the idea of rolling subscriptions through the App Store. Apple's refusal to share subscriber data limits publishers' ability to target their audiences for advertising and marketing purposes."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-26 18:28

Rupert Murdoch's tablet-only news publication, to be called The Daily, will be launched exclusively as an app for the iPad, and appear later on Android tablets, reports last week revealed. Since then, we've learned that The Daily's budget is believed to be US$30 million, with a staff of about 100, according to a report today by PC World.

A round-up of other information on the project is after the jump.

- The Daily will be published on the tablet seven days a week, and is expected to cost 99 cents a week, or US$4.25 a month.

- It will be headquartered in News Corp.'s New York offices and will cover the United States only, with no plans for foreign bureaux or a Washingon, D.C. bureau.

- Readership is expected to be between 100,000 to 500,000 over the first five years.

- A beta version is expected to launch by the end of the year, and a full launch is expected early in 2011.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-22 19:29

Last week, just hours after News Limited announced it would launch iPad apps for two of its Australian tabloids, James Murdoch, CEO of News Corp. in Europe and Asia and son of News Ltd's owner Rupert Murdoch, said sales of newspaper apps were cannibalizing the print version of the dailies.

But before apps as we know them even existed, it was once thought that free websites cannibalized print newspapers. At the time, Rupert Murdoch was one of the loudest voices against free online content. Today he is putting complete paywalls around News Corp.'s UK sites, TheTimes.co.uk and SundayTimes.co.uk.

Image: Huffington Post
But last week, when James Murdoch voiced his opinions on apps, he also said free websites might not really cannibalize print after all.

"The problem with the apps is they're much more directly cannibalistic of the core print product than the website," he said at the Monaco Media Forum, according to our sister publication, editorsweblog.org. "People interact with it much more like they do with the traditional product."

Reuters Blogs' Felix Salmon opined Friday that James Murdoch is likely only half right:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-11-15 23:57

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