WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Thu - 23.10.2014


rupert murdoch

A month after Fiji's military regime gave News Limited 90 days to sell The Fiji Times to a local or close it, PricewaterhouseCoopers is calling for expressions of interest from parties wanting to acquire the daily, The New Zealand Herald reported today.

"Interested parties must be able to provide evidence of their ability to meet the requirements of the Media Industry Development Decree 2010 and demonstrate financial capacity to make this acquisition," said PWC, which was hired two weeks ago by Rupert Murdoch's company to value the newspaper, The Fiji Times quoted.

After an evaluation, selected candidates will be required to sign a confidentiality agreement and present non-biding offers.

"Following an assessment of the indicative offers, a limited number of prospective purchasers will be shortlisted and allowed time to conduct their due diligence," the accounting firm explained.

According to The Fiji Times, News Limited will accept offers until August 9.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-07-30 17:31

Fijian ruler Frank Bainimarama said he has no regrets about the possible closure of The Fiji Times, which is own by Rupert Murdoch's News Limited, The Australian reported.

In June, under a decree demanding media outlets to be 90 percent owned by Fijians citizens, the government gave The Fiji Times three months to change its ownership or close. Since 2006, when Bainimarama led a military coup, the media has been struggling as the government has tightened controls and censorship.

"The reasons have been explained in the media decree... I guess, like everything else, people need to toe the line, including The Fiji Times," Bainimarama said to The Australian while explaining that the measures will "bring about transparency to the media."

He also said the newspaper's management and News Limited should be held accountable for the loss of jobs because they knew about the decree before it came into force and have done nothing to comply with it.

According to Fiji's Attorney General Aiyaz Sayed-Khaiyum, there will be no amendments to the decree and no extensions will be given, FijiVillage.com informed.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-07-22 16:29

News Limited has hired PricewaterhouseCoopers to value The Fiji Times for a possible sale, The Australian reported yesterday. This move comes after the June 28 order from Fiji's government that Rupert Murdoch's company must sell the publication to a local or close it entirely.

News Ltd. does not want to sell the newspaper; but because the Fijian government is ordering the sale, PwC will step in to value the business and then give advise on potential buyers. Heading the valuation team will be Jenny Seeto, based in Fiji.

"The environment is difficult but given the decree is clearly designed to force us to sell and pull out of Fiji within three months, we need to actively investigate all our options," John Hartigan, chairman and CEO of News Ltd., told The Australian.

Under the Media Industry Development Decree that went into effect June 28, media outlets must be 90 percent owned by Fijian citizens that reside in the country. Since 2006, when Fijian leader Frank Bainimarama led a military coup, the media has been struggling as the government has tightened controls and censorship.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-07-14 20:40

Newspapers everywhere are taking a good hard look at paid content, and how, or whether, paywalls can benefit them. Rupert Murdoch's The Times and Sunday Times are being watched today, as they begin charging for online content - the first non-specialist newspapers in Britain to do so.

As online ad prices and paid circulation go down, all while online readership soars, experts predict many newspapers will continue trying out different types of online paid content models. Other newspapers will certainly look to thetimes.co.uk and sundaytimes.co.uk for lessons. Both sites will charge £1 for a daily subscription, or £2 for a weekly subscription.

"We believe the new sites offer real value and we look forward to continuing to invest and innovate for readers," said Rebekah Brooks, CEO of News International, News Corp's British subsidiary, Agence France-Presse reported today.

The basics of an online paid content business model are based on both attracting enough paying customers and serving high-yielding advertisements to that very dedicated audience.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-07-03 01:18

Apple has recently announced an impressive feat for its new tablet: 3 million iPads have been sold since the device went on sale in the U.S. a mere 80 days ago. Moreover, software developers have created more than 11,000 apps for the device.

"The iPad has emerged as the first tablet computer with mainstream appeal, carving out new product category between smartphones and notebook computers," writes Adam Satariano. And consumers are not the only ones fawning over the iPad: Rupert Murdoch also recently declared his love for the device. "This is a fantastic invention," he said. "It combines the ability to present all forms of media to all people, from 3 year old children to 100 year old men."

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-24 19:36

Following the raising of paywalls across newspaper titles this month, News Corp is now putting its UK sports broadcaster, Sky Sports News, behind a paywall as well, MediaGuardian reported today.

BSkyB, which launched Sky Sports on Freeview eight years ago, is preparing to launch a new HD service. The move "marks a significant shift in BSkyB's attitude to the benefits of using the reach of the free-to-air service as a marketing channel to attract subscribers to its pay-TV service," and indicates BskyB may also put its website behind a paywall, according to the report. Sports fans will have to buy a subscription TV package to watch Sky Sports.
"As part of a subscription service, customers can look forward to expanded coverage and the launch of Europe's first HD sports news service," said Barney Francis, managiing director of Sky Sports, according to DigitalChoices.co.uk.

Sky Sports will be replaced on freeview with a "+1" time-shifted channel of Sky 3.

"I think it's another step in the chain of Murdoch deciding he won't give content away for free," Dominic Buch, an analyst at Numis, told the Financial Times.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-18 21:52

TheTimes.co.uk and SundayTimes.co.uk went behind a paywall this week, and in hopes of attracting paying online readers, the News Corp-owned titles are offering prizes of free tickets to Toy Story 3 or a weekend getaway to the Grosvenor Hotel in Dorset, Bloomberg reports.

The Times' strategy is an "all or nothing" approach, meaning all content will be behind a paywall, and Times and Sunday Times content will disappear almost completely from search results, such as Google News. The price will be £1 a day or £2 a week.

"We don't expect or require that all the people who do now will still look at it," Daniel Finkelstein, executive editor of the Times in London, told Bloomberg, in an article posted by the Sydney Morning Herald. "What's left is still a vast market."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-18 01:33

Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. has bought e-reading platform Skiff and purchased a share in Journalism Online, a company formed to enable newspapers, magazines, and online-only publishers to collect revenue from online readers.

Murdoch's acquisition of Skiff signifies another step in his effort to make online readers pay for content. Jon Miller, chief digital officer of News Corp., said "both Skiff and Journalism Online serve as key building blocks in our strategy to transform the publishing industry and ensure consumers will have continued access to the highest quality journalism."

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-06-15 18:32

It seems News International is making good on its promise to remove its newspapers from search indexes and news aggregators. Yesterday, Rupert Murdoch's The Sun Online blocked Meltwater, an online media monitoring company that notifies companies when they have been mentioned in newspapers, according to paidContent.

This move comes as the Wapping-based publications prepare to erect paywalls around their Web sites. Back in March, the Times Online also blocked Meltwater in response to the company refusing to compensate the newspaper for aggregating its content. Once again, the Murdoch-owned newspaper used the robots.txt protocol, software that prevents web crawlers from accessing a website, to block Meltwater.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-14 21:38

The launch of the Wall Street Journal's New York Section has prompted the Guardian's Peter Preston to consider the future focus of national newspapers like the Journal. If the Journal, once a solely-national paper, can move towards local coverage, is that the inevitable future for the rest of the large nationals in the industry?

He seems to think yes. The WSJ's Greater New York launch wasn't a personal attack on the New York Times or Arthur Sulzberger; rather, it was a smart business move in changing times.

"In spite of all the hype and excitement, this isn't some wild News Corporation lurch into alien territory," writes Preston. "It's competition as usual in an American newspaper world that seems to have forgotten what competition means."

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-04 20:41

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