WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Mon - 22.12.2014


search engine wars

The European Commission announced that on Tuesday it began investigating anti-trust allegations related to Google's activity, after which the tech giant revealed that it should have been "more transparent" regarding its mechanism of ranking competitor's search engines, The Telegraph informed yesterday.

Image via Geeky Gadgets

Google might just have abused its powerful position by diminishing the ranking of search results from other engines, The Inquirer speculated. There was also the possibility that Google might have asked certain advertisers to sign an exclusivity contract that obliged them not to place any ads from competing outlets. Furthermore, Google might have imposed guidelines on the presence of ad campaigns on competing online advertising platforms, said a press release from the Commission.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-12-02 17:40

Google News stopped hosting new Associated Press articles in late December, but quietly began hosting them again yesterday. The Wall Street Journal's Russell Adams was the first to notice.

A Google spokesman told Adams: "We have a licensing agreement with the Associated Press that permits us to host its content on Google properties such as Google News. The licensing agreement is the subject of ongoing discussion so we won't be commenting further at this time."

Google News stopped hosting new Associated Press articles in late December, but quietly began hosting them again yesterday. The Wall Street Journal's Russell Adams was the first to notice.

A Google spokesman told Adams: "We have a licensing agreement with the Associated Press that permits us to host its content on Google properties such as Google News. The licensing agreement is the subject of ongoing discussion so we won't be commenting further at this time."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-02-11 00:57

Italian media group Gruppo Editoriale L'Espresso's chairman has announced his support for daily business newspaper Il Sole 24 Ore, which last week ran an article by Google CEO Eric Schmidt. The argument between the press and Google on how much control should be leveraged over content has escalated throughout 2009, and Carlo De Benedetti wrote in an editorial Wednesday that "the problem is that in today's media world there's an obvious imbalance in Google's favour."

Il Sole 24 Ore was right to offer readers Schmidt's point of view, because much of the future of the news depends on the relationship between news content providers and Google, he stated, calling the launch of Google's First Click Free policy "more a diversion than a change of strategy."

"Big G is gearing itself to give every user, everywhere and at all times everything he needs, beginning with the news. In this way, newspapers become only one of Google's many content providers. And since big advertising is linked to other keywords and not to the news, as Google's CEO so aptly explains, who'll pay for the work of editorial and publishing staff?" De Benedetti wrote.

He goes on to state:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-11 23:04

News Corp.'s Rupert Murdoch is no longer standing alone in the wind as he rails against the unpaid aggregation of content by search engine giant Google, Bloomberg reported yesterday. Publishers A.H. Belo and MediaNews Group may soon shield their content with paywalls, and de-index that paid content from search engines, Editor & Publisher reported.

Publishers resent Google because it does not share with them the money it makes from advertisements displayed next to news search results, Reuters said yesterday. Murdoch's ire goes one step further, seeking direct compensation from search engines for access to News Corp.'s articles, BBC reported yesterday.

The contemplated pullout entails severe risk of invisibility for the publications at issue, MediaBuyerPlanner yesterday observed. Currently, Google enjoys 65 percent of the U.S. search market, leaving Microsoft's Bing only 9.9 percent.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-25 13:10

Days after media mogul Rupert Murdoch accused Google of copyright infringement, two media lawyers co-authored an editorial in one of Murdoch's U.S. newspapers in defense of such a theory, TechDirt reported Friday.

According to Bruce Sanford and Bruce Brown of Baker Hostetler in Washington, D.C., the world's largest search engine is illegal because it "make[s] and store[s] full copies of texts to power [its] search functions, profit[s] from this material, and at the same time demand[s] that copyright holders opt out if they don't want to be google-able," they wrote in a Wall Street Journal editorial.

Image: Murdoch at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, 2007. Photo from WEF's Flickr.

The lawyers, using last week's book-scanning settlement extension as the timepeg for the opinion piece, characterise Google's defense as analogising its services to that of a library. They reject the legal shield such a premise implies - that of "fair use" - saying search engines earn ad revenue for cataloguing information where libraries do not, rendering the search engines' use inherently unfair.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-11-17 20:01

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