WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Tue - 02.09.2014


social media

"2011 had the most incidents of violence against journalists in Afghanistan yet," according to a report by David Cole on the MediaShift Idea Lab website, which has also mapped the incidents.

Huffington Post launched "Huff Post labs" today. Its first project, called Highlights, is "a collection of the most popular sentences from articles and blog posts across the Huffington Post empire," writes Klint Finley on the TechCrunch website.

Allowing the public access to your reporting process, and accepting more and different contributors than you’d find through traditional means," is really what social is all about, according to Daniel Victor, Social Media Producer at The New York Times in an interview with Muck Rack.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-08-29 20:13

"The collective intelligence of the newsroom is something we rarely exploit efficiently," writes Gavin Sheridan, Innovation Director of Storyful in a blog post where he discusses the concept of newsrooms as intelligence agencies.

On the Ebyline BlogSusan Johnston reports on the acceleration of paywalls at US newspapers based on the latest data from the Newspaper Association of America.

The Guardian reports that Twitter has suspended the account of Guy Adams, a journalist for the UK's Independent, who was critical of Olympics coverage by NBC.

"At the Financial Times, we recognized early on that the continued success of our business depended on our ability to adapt to changing reader habits," writes Rob Grimshaw of the FT in an article about "publishing in the age of social media" on The Economist Group's website.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-07-31 18:21

“Citizen Media is the new form of a newswire, often quicker than anything else,” said Riyaad Minty, Al Jazeera’s head of social media, in an email exchange with WAN-IFRA earlier this year.

This may be true, but dealing with content from the Internet requires high standards of authentication, and sometimes even big players mess up. During the past week, the BBC has become a case in point. It has made two mistakes with sourcing its images – one serious, one merely embarrassing.

The major error came when the BBC mistakenly used an image taken in Iraq in 2003 to accompany an online story about the recent massacre in Houla, Syria. As Poynter reports, the caption to the photo, shown on the BBC’s website, read, “this image – which cannot be independently verified – is believed to show the bodies of children in Houla awaiting burial.” The picture was credited to an anonymous “Activist.”

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-29 18:54

Social media giveth, and social media taketh away… When Facebook launched its "frictionless sharing" social reader apps last September in partnership with news organisations including The Guardian, The Independent and The Washington Post, many in the media business hailed it as a major boost for the industry. Now, however, the number of people using social news reader apps has taken a plunge, after changes implemented by Facebook.

Just over one month after the social reader’s launch, Facebook announced that The Guardian app had been installed nearly 4 million times, and had pushed up page impressions by around 1 million every day. According to Facebook, The Washington Post’s app gained 3.5 million active monthly users in its first month, and 83% of its users were under 35.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-09 18:06

Tumblr is planning to allow brands to promote themselves by buying a spot on its Radar feature, wrote GigaOm yesterday. The site’s founder David Karp, who is quoted in the article, explains that the change is “about making Tumblr much more accessible to brands.” The move should help Tumblr, which has been booming in recent months, profit from its ever-growing audience.  

GigaOm explains that Radar, part of the Tumblr dashboard that highlights editorially-curated posts, currently features around 15 posts a day, and receives about 120 million daily impressions. This is an audience that advertisers will be able to tap into directly into starting May 2.

The new feature, like promoted Tweets on Twitter, allows Tumblr to monetize an organic part of its site, rather than selling display advertising. This means that Tumblr will be able to make money, and brands will be able to integrate themselves into every-day users’ social experience. Karp, quoted by GigaOm, touts the power of the new ads, suggesting that Tumblr’s flexible format will allow brands to unleash their creativity, rather than constraining them to short phrases like Twitter.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-04-19 15:41

Social media is a powerful tool for media organisations. It can be used to gather news, connect with audiences and increase the impact of stories. But social media can bite the hand that feeds it too - it can turn into an equally powerful forum to spread mistakes and amplify negative reactions to a brand.  

How can media companies handle these kind of situations to maintain the trust of their communities, deal with negative comments and ensure that they are sharing accurate information?

A panel discussion at the Social Media World Forum in London today, featuring representatives from a variety of industries including broadcast media, the police force and social networks themselves, tried to provide some answers.

Here's what they said:

 - Be prepared in advance.

As David Bailey, neighbourhood communications manager for the Staffordshire police put it, “you can’t learn social media while the streets are burning.”

If a big, negative story is about to break, you have to already have built up a connection with the community, and know how to respond to your users comments and criticisms. Colin Smith, the UK’s director of marketing solutions for LinkedIn backed Bailey up, emphasising that “people respond well if you’ve already built up trust.”

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-27 18:56

Google+ has come in for a lot of flack. It’s been called a “ghost town” by various news organisations and one viral image explaining social networks through the medium of donuts (of all things!) implied that while every other social platform serves a obvious purpose, the only people using Google+ were Google+ employees.

Speaking at the Social Media World Forum in London today, Chris Brogan, president of Human Business Works and author of Google Plus for Business, makes the case that businesses – and by extension publishers – should be thinking about Google+.

Brogan argues:

1)   Google is the biggest search engine in the world. But Google knows that links aren’t the only way people go to content, so it’s building its social presence. Google has been forcibly integrating Google+ into its search results through “social search plus your world” (although the function can be turned off) which means that what people’s friends say about your brand on Google+ affects how visible your search is. Don’t miss out on that business.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-03-27 12:05

News organisations that wish to expand and improve their social media presence might want to take a page from the Google playbook.

Speaking at WAN-IFRA's 7th Middle East Conference in Dubai, Maha Abouelenein, Head of Communications for Google in the Middle East, had some advice for news organisations, based on Google's experience. Here are some of Google's insights:

- Focus on the user. "Google builds the products, but users decide what is successful and what is not," says Ms Abouelenein.

- Empower others. "Everyone has a mobile phone with a camera on it, so people expect to view things now, live. The truth is at their fingertips to broadcast news to the world."

- Ideas come from everywhere. "We have a policy of spending 20 per cent of our time - one day a week - outside of the core job. I challenge you to spend 20 per cent of your time thinking about the newsroom of the future."

- Think big, but start small.

- Never fail to fail. "Google fails a lot. How we take these failures and learn and grow makes us better, more friendly for our readers."

- Launch early and iterate often. "A lot of times, companies want to polish a product before they launch it. We don't do that at Google. We launch early, put it in the hands of users, update it. Users are the best to tell us how to make it more relevant."

Author

Larry Kilman's picture

Larry Kilman

Date

2012-02-29 14:05

Once upon a time, news flows were relatively simple. Information would travel from a source to a news organisation, to the general public. Although that chain might not have been quite as simple as it seemed (a journalist might influence his or her sources, or public reactions might influence a news organisation) for the most part, information flowed one way, and one way only.

Now a new regional SFN report from WAN-IFRA, authored by Professor Christof Seeger and Leander Blumenthal describes the way that social media and digital publishing has turned this news flow upside-down. The report, titled "Communication and gatekeeper research" points out that media organisations are no longer the primary "gatekeepers" of information; an engaged public also plays an important role in curating news by deciding what content to republish, recommend or pass on.

What's more, as every internet user becomes a potential publisher, the old formula in which news professionals would look through sources and select the most relevant for publication has also been turned on its head: sources are now published first on social networks and edited after the fact.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-20 20:03

Facebook's $5 billion IPO filing this week has left the world in little doubt about the growing importance of social media in our lives. Now, both adapting to this trend and looking at its power, Reuters has launched a social media hub with a special focus on the interaction between social media and business.

Social Pulse, as the new hub is called, contains a curated selection of news from across Reuters' social media networks. The top section, titled The Hit List, features the most popular stories shared by people followed by Reuters accounts and Reuters journalists on Twitter. In a blogpost about Social Pulse, Reuters stresses that it follows influential "newsmakers", to bring its readers stories popular with the people who are setting the news agenda. The section is managed through the curation company Percolate, also used by IPG and American Express.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-02-03 19:08

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