Date

Tue - 22.07.2014


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Are things looking good for The New York Times?

Peter Kafka writes for All Things D that, according to Barclays analyst Kannan Venkateshwar, the Times’ circulation growth may start balancing out its advertising losses by the middle of 2014.

Venkateshwar’s prediction suggests that the Times’ paywall, which boasts 450,000 subscribers, is starting to pay off. More than that, it may be seen as a vindication of the Times’ digital strategy, which drew criticism after the paper posted a year-on-year decline in digital advertising revenue last month.

When the drop was announced, paidContent noted that, even though Times’ subscription revenue increased by 9.7% from the previous year, the results were “worrisome for a news industry staking its future on digital revenue.”

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-05-15 17:42

Some early observers of Ongo.com may be missing the point.

The subscription site, which launched Jan. 25, is intent on being a great "personal news experience." While there are questions about readers' willingness to pay for their news, especially when it is free elsewhere, Ongo is not trying to sell content.

Continue reading on Poynter

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-02-03 18:57

Apple Inc. and magazine publishers haven't been able to come to an agreement on the terms of magazine app subscriptions for the iPad, AllThingsD reported Friday. Publishers want a direct link to their clients by being able to sell the subscriptions themselves, or at least keep subscribers' data. Apple says "no."

For the past couple months, Apple has instead been offering magazines 70 percent of the revenue from each sale; the "ability to offer an opt-in form for subscribers that would ask them for a limited amount of information" such as their name, address, e-mail, etc.; and the ability to sell subscriptions to their apps through iTunes, Peter Kafka explained.

Image: bipad.net Although the publishers have a problem with the 30 percent cut of their subscriptions Apple wants, they are more miffed that the company is refusing to give them subscribers' credit card data, used for marketing. It also allows them to offer print and digital bundles, Kafka pointed out.

From the beginning, magazine publishers have been some of the iPad's biggest proponents. Conde Nast, for example, has said it expects as much as 40 percent of its revenues to come from tablets in the future, the Observer noted.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-12-06 23:37

The Boston Globe announced that it would start a new paid Web site in the later half of 2011. The web site, called BostonGlobe.com, will be in addition to the existing, Boston.com, which the company calls a "two-brand" strategy, New York Times reported in a blog.

The new site will include all news and feature stories published in the print edition, while Boston.com will remain free and offer local news and classified advertising, but access to full stories, commentary, features and other content will be limited, The Associated Press reported.

Readers' registration for either site will be required, but at different points.

Boston.com will provide a limited amount of content to be viewed before asking readers to register. BostonGlobe.com, however, will require readers to register and subscribe immediately for its paid service. Those who subscribe the printed edition will receive a free BostonGlobe.com subscription, New York Times reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-09-30 23:44

In an effort to tap the mobile platform for revenue, Australian media group Fairfax has unveiled iPhone apps based on the subscription model for its newspapers, The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, Brisbane Today and WAToday, the Sydney Morning Herald reported yesterday.

While most newspaper publishers have opted for a one-off fee payment system, the Fairfax group is the first publisher to have launched an iPhone app based on the subscription model, according to the Sydney Morning Herald. Readers can download the apps from the Apple iTunes store at a monthly charge of $2.49 and those who opt for subscriptions over a six-month period are entitled to a 15 percent discount, and therefore will pay only $12.99.

Image: AdNews Australia

"It's the first move by Fairfax Media to charge for its online news content on a mobile phone," Brian McCarthy, chief executive at the Fairfax group, was quoted by The Australian as saying. "The development of the apps is a milestone in our ongoing strategy around the delivery of content through digital platforms."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-09-30 20:36

A newspaper subscription website, newspaper-subscription.co.uk, has been launched in the United Kingdom by ThreePM, which also runs a magazine subscription website, InternetRetailing.net reported today.

The website offers discounts for both UK and international newspapers, as well as news magazines. Titles available through the site include The Times and Sunday Times, the Daily Mail and Mail on Sunday, The Independent and Independent on Sunday, The Guardian, The Observer, The Weekly World Edition of the Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph and The Economist.
"Although the online 'range retailer' is still significant, for many consumers it's more convenient to be able to look at titles in just the specific subject areas of interest to them. We now give consumers the choice of how they find what they want," Don Brown, ThreePM's business director, told InternetRetailing.net.

The company's magazine subscription site, subscription.co.uk, offers one and two-year subscriptions, with delivery available to the United Kingdom, Europe, or United States or the rest of the world, with varying prices due to delivery charges. Users can also give gift subscriptions through the site, and browse magazines by category.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-06-30 00:15

Magazine publishers are finding new ways to connect with readers through Facebook by giving them an opportunity to read content and subscribe without leaving the social networking site, AdAge reported last week.

Until recently, companies have widely used Facebook to direct traffic to external Web sites. But coming in July or August, with the introduction of a new system being developed by e-commerce application development company Alvenda and Time Inc.'s subscription division, called Synapse, users will be able to access magazine content integrated in the Facebook news feeds as blurbs. Users will be able to expand the blurbs in order to read the full story and ads will appear along with the story on Facebook itself, without being redirected to an external link.
Users will also be able to subscribe to magazines of their choice within Facebook.

"Consumers don't want to leave where they are on the web, wherever they are," Alix Hart, VP for online marketing at Synapse, told AdAge. "Facebook is a place where we think that over the coming year there are going to be more and more opportunities to present magazine offers in a really relevant way to consumers, as they're starting to share magazine content in a much deeper way than ever before."

This new system also presents an alternative revenue maximising opportunity for publishers by integrating magazine content along with ads on readers' news feeds to grab maximum reach.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-17 23:12

The Wall Street Journal is cutting its subscription prices by up to 80 percent in some cases, as it challenges its rival, The New York Times, with its New York City edition, Reuters reported today.

The WSJ has sent some Times subscribers a home delivery offer for US$10 a month, which undercuts the price The Times charges subscribers in the New York City area by $30. Current Journal subscribers pay about $30 per month and get free Web site access, and an offer for $2.29 per week is now available to new subscribers who apply online.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-04-01 02:02

By all accounts, it was a red-letter day for the Wall Street Journal.

First, Reuters reported that the newspaper's digital division would be launching a specialty product, providing premium subscribers more specialised news in niche areas than the regular paper already delivers. Then, Editor & Publisher listed the newspaper's online edition as having drawn the second most unique visitors in September among all U.S. newspapers.

The number of uniques seemed especially notable given the Wall Street Journal's Web site has a partial paywall, as well as its recent announcement it will be implementing paywalls on its mobile site, even for subscribers. However, a closer look at wsj.com's fee structure revealed that mobile phone users who sign up before Saturday may yet preview the Journal for free through January. This window of unpaid opportunity likely accounts for the spike in first-time visitors to the site.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-21 19:26

Publisher Patrick J. Purcell yesterday announced the Boston Herald's intention to erect a paywall to access its online content as early as next year, the Boston Globe reported today. He acknowledged, however, that the success of such a venture rested on a joint effort.

"If the Globe doesn't do it, then it would be hard for us to do it,'' Purcell told the Herald. The Herald's last attempt to charge a fee for online content in 2001 did not meet with success. Twitter comments today discussed the move, with a majority of users stating that paying for The Herald online is largely unfavorable.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-20 22:43

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