WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Wed - 26.11.2014


The Guardian

Two weeks ago when the SFN blog examined the National Readership Survey (NRS)’s report on print and online news consumption, we suggested that encouraging digital figures for quality titles could be of great interest to advertisers. Looking at the same figures, The Guardian’s Investigations Executive Editor, David Leigh, had an altogether more radical idea: a £2 pound levy on broadband services.

Thanks to the BBC’s free-to-access, taxpayer-funded news website, British news consumers will always have access to reliable, up-to-date news reports. This, Leigh argues, means that the paywall model will “never really work in the UK context.” 

The noted investigative journalist reasons, in an article posted to MediaGuardian, that the simplest and most effective means of solving the financial dilemma faced by British news publishers is a “small levy on UK broadband providers [that] could be distributed to news providers in proportion to their UK online readership.” Brits are not particularly inclined to pay for online news, Leigh continues, but almost 20 million UK households are, and will continue to be, willing to pay for essential broadband subscriptions.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-09-24 16:01

One hundred jobs will be cut at The Guardian and The Observer after their publisher, Guardian Media & News (GNM), reported operating losses of £44.2 million for the financial year 2011/2012. Addressing staff at a briefing on Tuesday morning, Alan Rusbridger, the Editor-in-Chief of the two titles, announced that GNM would be introducing a voluntary redundancy scheme (an agreement with the National Union of Journalists means that at the Guardian titles the forced redundancy of a member would necessitate a strike ballot)

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-18 17:33

By Federica Cherubini

Six countries, six leading newspapers, a huge audience and one common theme: Europe, how to explain it better, how to understand it better, how to build it better. This is the aim of an editorial project which saw six papers joining forces to produce a joint special edition on the situation of the European Union.

"The state of the Union", echoing the State of the union speech US President Obama gave on 24 January, is the angle of the first issue of Europa (more will be expected in future) produced by El Pais, the Guardian, Le Monde, Süddeutsche Zeitung, Gazeta Wyborcza and La Stampa.

This joint special editorial supplement aims to give a "more nuanced picture of the EU and explore what Europe does well and what not so well", as the Guardian explained.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-27 15:21

API is a term that is increasingly referred to in relation to news outlets. APIs are not new - indeed it has been two years since the Guardian launched it's open API. But what does it mean for the online journalism industry today and why is are APIs so important?

Continue reading on journalism.co.uk

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-02 11:18

British newspaper The Guardian launched today Data Store, a new site dedicated to "data journalism and visualization," thenextweb.com reported.

"Data journalism has become an increasingly big part of our work here at the Guardian - from Wikileaks to government spending, it's our job to make the key data accessible and easy to understand," editor Simon Rogers explained in a blog post.

Image source: currybet.net
The site allows users to search the world's government and global development databases as well as the infographics published by the newspaper. It also includes Rogers' Datablog, which was launch in March of 2009, and feature applications that have been developed to analyze and visualize data.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-12-17 15:35

British newspaper The Guardian revealed last week that it will discontinue its recently updated and paid iPhone app and replace it with a subscription-based one, Poynter.org reported.

The Guardian's mobile product manager Jonathon Moore explained in a blog post that subscribers will be charged £2.99 for six months or £3.99 for 12 months. According to Poynter.org, "No pounds-to-dollars conversion is necessary as in the U.S. it will be free, and advertising supported."

Photo: paidContent.org

The announcement was made as the newspaper introduced an updated version of its current app, which reported problems with the offline reading mode. The Guardian explained on its website that it has not yet set a date for the launching but "we're working towards a pre-Christmas release."

Moore said the new app will include videos, live soccer scores, goal alerts and the ability to post and read comments. He also reminded that the media company is developing an iPad app.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-12-06 18:21

Foreign news coverage in British newspapers has declined by 40 percent since 1979, according to a report issued yesterday by Media Standard Trust, The Guardian reported.

The study, called Shrinking World: The Decline of International Reporting in the British Press, analysed the number of international news published in The Guardian, The Telegraph, Daily Mail, and the Daily Mirror during a week in 1979, 1989, 1999 and 2009, Journalism.co.uk explained.

In 2009, these articles represented 11 percent of the overall stories published by the four newspapers, down from 20 percent in 1979, The Press Gazette pointed out. But the coverage has gone down despite the increase in newspaper pages. For instance, "The Guardian has gone from under 30 pages a day to over 100; the Mirror from just over 30 pages to more than 70," said Martin Moore, director of Media Standard Trust, in a article published by The Guardian.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-11-02 16:40

The Guardian Media Group will launch in the next few months a home delivery service in central London for its two flagship newspapers, The Guardian and The Observer, Media Week reported today.

The strategy is aimed at securing long-term readers in order to offset falling circulation. Although specific details have not been officially released, Media Week revealed that some of the subscription packages that will be offered include "free delivery of weekday and weekend alternatives within the M25 region."

Photo: EPA via The Daily Telegraph In the past two years, several national newspapers have started to implement the delivery service. For instance, The Independent launched its home delivery in 2008 and is currently available "in selected London and Kent postcodes" from Monday to Friday for £4.00 a week or from Monday to Saturday at £5.00.

The Times and The Sunday Times also offer the service. Although it was initially free and readers could cancel at any time, since January of 2010 they have to sign up for an entire year or pay 30p per day to receive the paper at home, MediaGuardian reported.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-09-24 23:59

A recently survey found The Sun as the leading Nigerian newspaper in terms of circulation and readership, the newspaper reported on Monday.

The survey conducted as part of Zus Bureau Limited's Quarterly Media Audience Audit for the first quarter, found The Sun, Punch and The Guardian as the most popular newspapers in the Lagos area.

The Sun was the most popular paper with those aged 45 and above and was the most popular newspaper overall with a 21.4 percent share of the market. The Punch had the second largest readership with 16.7 percent and Soccer Star, a football newspaper, finished third with an 11.9 percent share.

The Zus Bureau Quarterly Media Audience Audit has been the gauge of media popularity in Lagos, Aba and Kaduna since 1994.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-05-25 15:50

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