Date

Sat - 19.04.2014


Twitter

Brian Boyer, the Head of NPR's news apps team, offers advice on “making useful things for people,” in a post on Nieman Lab's website titled "Welcome to Hacker Journalism 101, take your seats."

Covering the US political conventions costs media organisations dearly, but The Washington Post's Paul Farhi writes that it is also essential in terms of credibility.

News International could face 230 new claims relating to alleged phone hacking, according to a report on the Guardian's website.

On PoynterHerbert Lowe offers seven tips for writing "a Twitter bio that’ll make you stand out as a journalist"

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-09-07 18:31

In a post on Nieman LabKen Doctor considers whether "newspapers have a shot at stepping ahead of their broadcast rivals as web video evolves."

On PoynterMallary Jean Tenore discusses "What Twitter teaches us about writing short & well"

The UK's Press Gazette reports that The Wall Street Journal is hosting a series of events with a tech theme in Shoreditch, East London, for three days from 12 September.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-08-30 18:48

What do you do when you’ve already launched two incredibly successful publishing platforms? If you’re Twitter co-founders Evan Williams and Biz Stone, the answer is simple: work on another one.

Just over a week ago Obvious Corporation, the company that developed Blogger and Twitter, unveiled Medium, a collaborative publishing tool designed as a simple way for users to express themselves online with images and text. At first glance this basic premise suggests that Medium has little to offer that is not already provided by other blogging sites. Indeed, GigaOM’s Mathew Ingram commentedthat Medium “feels like a cross between Tumblr and Pinterest.” The site’s format is agreeably simple, with both text and photos organised on a grid-based layout. Medium, like Tumblr, provides a simple article template for each post, and a lack of superfluous visual elements and advertisements contribute to an overall sense of elegance and efficiency.  

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-08-22 17:22

Over the weekend The New York Times former executive editor and current columnist Bill Keller fell victim to an elaborate Internet hoax. An opinion piece titled “WikiLeaks, A Post Postscript,” supposedly a follow-up to an article written by Keller in February of this year, was shared through a Twitter account that appeared to belong to Keller and swiftly re-tweeted by journalists, including The Guardian’s Dan Gilmore and the NYT’s own technology correspondent Nick Bilton. Readers were initially fooled by the visual similarities between the fake article and Keller’s regular column. In addition, the advertisements featured on the page were genuine, and all links connected to nytimes.com. On closer inspection, the lack of The New York Times favicon next to the web page’s URL, and the fact that the domain name differs from that used for real NYT op-ed pieces indicated that the article was a fake.

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-30 18:41

It looks like a normal tweet. It can be re-tweeted, replied to and marked as a “favourite” like a normal tweet, but Twitter’s new targeted tweets are not shared in the same way as the standard model, and it’s this feature that seems to be paying dividends for advertisers like The Washington Post.

Only five days ago Twitter officially announced that it would be enhancing its "Promoted Tweets," having already piloted a new scheme with British Airways, Wendys, The Washington Post and Coca-Cola. The changes introduced mean that instead of publishing a tweet to all followers and only being able to make it a promoted tweet afterwards, advertisers can target specific sections of their audiences according to geographical location, or device (desktop/ laptop computer vs. mobile phones, tablets).

Author

Amy Hadfield's picture

Amy Hadfield

Date

2012-07-24 18:32

Next Issue has come to the king of touch screens, and the excitement is palpable. Time is calling the magazine bundling app the Hulu for magazines, and TechCrunchhas tentatively likened it to Netflix (the American movie-mailing service that has given the DVD a renaissance, for those without zip codes). This joint venture between Condé NastTime IncHearstMeredith and News Corp is “probably the easiest and most economical way for you to read your favourite titles” on your iPad according to Anthony Ha. Is it a good enough deal that consumers will pay for the content? PaidContent takes a look.

Author

Emma Knight's picture

Emma Knight

Date

2012-07-10 17:35

"No comment".

Business executives had become more and more adept at hiding behind this phrase, argues David Carr of The New York Times in an article published on Sunday. Not only that, but major figures in business are often obscured by "communications" teams that are anything but communicative. But now, suggests Carr, "Twitter has the potential to cut past all that clutter".

Carr writes that thanks to Twitter "there's a chance to get a glimpse into the thinking of otherwise unapproachable executives, and sometimes even have a real dialogue with them".

He uses Rupert Murdoch as an example. The News Corp executive joined the microblogging platform at the very end of last year, and has since made the headlines several times with Tweets that Carr calls "devoid of nuance, partisan in the extreme and prone to crankiness, all consistent with the Rupert Murdoch we have come to know".

Murdoch has used the platform to take sides on divisive issues. He voiced his strong support of SOPA and attacked President Obama for not supporting it, tweeting: "So Obama has thrown in his lot with Silicon Valley paymasters who threaten all software creators with piracy, plain thievery."

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-31 16:37

The Washington Post announced last Friday that it was launching campaignreads.com, a new section of its site "completely powered by our readers" where it shares a curated selection of Tweets with links to coverage of the US presidential election.

Post Politics wrote that, for the past few weeks, it had been asking readers to share links to their favourite election coverage by tweeting @PostPolitics or with the hashtag #campaignreads. The Post's political team now curates these Tweets using Storify, and publishes them on its new page.

The initiative has potential benefits for Post journalists and their readers. Firstly it helps the Post "filter the deluge of campaign coverage" by asking its users for selection of the articles they enjoyed the most. Secondly it gives readers prominence by crediting them on the campaignreads.com if the Post uses articles that they've shared.

So far, the new section does not seem to be receiving a deluge of Tweets; as of 2.30pm (GMT +1) on Monday 30th January, the last link that had been shared was from Thursday 26th January. What's more, a Twitter search for #campaignreads doesn't bring up a huge return.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-30 15:58

Twitter announced yesterday that it would begin selectively blocking Tweets in some countries.

"Starting today, we give ourselves the ability to reactively withhold content from users in a specific country -- while keeping it available in the rest of the world. We have also built in a way to communicate transparently to users when content is withheld, and why."

Twitter writes that it will withhold access to Tweets in certain countries "if we receive a valid and properly scoped request from an authorized entity". As an example of illegal material it names pro-Nazi content, which is outlawed in France and Germany.

The micro-blogging platform implies that it will not comply with all government requests to remove content. It states that, in some countries, the ideas about freedom of expression "differ so much from our ideas that we will not be able to exist there".

Until now, Twitter had to remove content from its entire network if it received a valid legal order to take it down in one country. This change in policy means that Twitter can block Tweets region by region.

Author

Hannah Vinter's picture

Hannah Vinter

Date

2012-01-27 18:58

by Mathew Ingram

We've written many times about how journalism is changing in the age of social media, thanks to what Om has called the "democracy of distribution" provided by tools like Twitter -- and how everyone now has the opportunity to function as a journalist, even for a short time, during news events like the attack on Osama bin Laden's compound. A new study of the way information flowed during the Arab Spring uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt earlier this year paints a fascinating picture of how what some call "news as a process" works, and the roles bloggers, mainstream media and other actors play during a breaking news event. More than anything, it's a portrait of what the news looks like now.

Continue reading on GigaOM

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-12-22 18:24

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