WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Thu - 18.12.2014


Web traffic

"2011 had the most incidents of violence against journalists in Afghanistan yet," according to a report by David Cole on the MediaShift Idea Lab website, which has also mapped the incidents.

Huffington Post launched "Huff Post labs" today. Its first project, called Highlights, is "a collection of the most popular sentences from articles and blog posts across the Huffington Post empire," writes Klint Finley on the TechCrunch website.

Allowing the public access to your reporting process, and accepting more and different contributors than you’d find through traditional means," is really what social is all about, according to Daniel Victor, Social Media Producer at The New York Times in an interview with Muck Rack.

Author

Brian Veseling's picture

Brian Veseling

Date

2012-08-29 19:13

Mail Online, Associated Newspapers' online network, has overtaken the Huffington Post to become the second most popular news website in the world in March, according to new figures from metrics firm comScore.

Arianna Huffington's groundbreaking news and opinion website, which was bought by AOL for $315m (£193m) in February, was leapfrogged by Mail Online, which is now second only to the New York Times in ComScore's "newspapers" category.

Continue reading on MediaGuardian

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-04-20 10:33

While newspapers around the world are anxiously asking themselves what would happen if they started charging readers to view articles online, a few answers have started to emerge.

Steven Brill's Journalism Online experiment, which developed a system that allows newspapers to charge their most regular online visitors, has analyzed its preliminary data and found on average that advertising revenue and overall traffic did not decline significantly despite predictions otherwise.

Continue reading on nytimes.com

Author

Anton Jolkovski's picture

Anton Jolkovski

Date

2011-01-18 16:42

Elle Magazine UK has announced the launch of three additional fashion channels on its website, Brand Republic reported today. According to a spokeswoman, the initiative is a reaction to the 40 percent surge in organic traffic to the site and demand from advertisers.

"Elle UK has enjoyed phenomenal growth over the past year and I am delighted that we are able to respond by adding innovative content that will further add to the ELLEuk experience, expanding the breadth of our editorial coverage and boosting our advertising inventory," said Anna Jones, the publisher's digital and strategy director.

The title, published by Hachette Filipacchi, now has "Fashion", "Style" and "Shop" alongside previous channels like "Catwalk" and "StarStyle." In "Shop" (left), users can browse through weekly shopping selections and then be redirected to the appropriate websites. The "Fashion" channel incorporates an "Ask the Experts" section while "Style" bears tips on what to wear for specific events.

Image via Brand Republic

Elle UK had an ABC circulation figure amounting to 195,625 for the first half of 2010. It has more than 162,000 followers on Twitter, Brand Republic informed.

Author

Alisa Zykova

Date

2010-11-02 18:16

The Independent's website saw the biggest month-on-month increase in daily visitors among all national newspaper websites in the United Kingdom last month, MediaGuardian reported today. Average daily users were up 12.9 percent from August to September, reaching 553,593, according to data from the Audit Bureau of Circulations.

The Mail Online continued to be the UK's most visited newspaper website, with an average of 2,670,371 daily visitors in September, a rise of 4.6 percent month-on-month. The Guardian's Web traffic was up 5 percent, to 2,038,493. Earlier this week audience research firm Nielsen estimated that an average of 362,000 UK Web users went behind the Times and Sunday Times paywalls between July and September.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-10-28 21:40

Facebook drives 13 times more traffic to French news sites than Twitter, which only accounts for one click per 100 visits, according to a study conducted by AT Internet Institute, paidContent reported today.

Among the top 12 leading news sites in the country, Facebook is responsible for 1.3 percent of visits and Twitter for 0.1 percent. By way of comparison, researchers also looked at the traffic driven by Google and found that the search engine' share is 40.6 percent or 30 times greater than Facebook, AT Internet explained in a press release.

Graphic source: AT Internet Institute

"This figure remains high, but we should not forget that the main function of a search engine, such as Google, is to suggest links to Internet users. This is not the case for Facebook," the company reminded.

The low impact of Twitter is becoming a trend in some countries. According to paidContent, a study released in March showed that the 140-character site only drives 0.14 percent of the traffic to U.S. news sites.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-09-29 16:52

Combined traffic to The Times and The Sunday Times websites has fallen to 1.61 million visits in July, from 2.22 million in June and 2.79 million in May, according to comScore's latest findings, Media Week reported yesterday.

News International, which owns the newspapers, was expecting its readership to decline dramatically as it began charging for online content in July, New Media Age reminded.
However, comScore numbers revealed "a better performance than many predicted," The Independent explained, as media experts had forecast losses of more than 84 percent.

According to the study, readers are spending an average of four minutes per visit in the websites down from the 7.6 minutes in May. Page views have also decreased from 29 million in May to 9 million in July.

Author

Clara Mart

Date

2010-08-17 23:56

U.S. newspaper sites continue to see increases Web traffic, according to the latest comScore figures released by the Newspaper National Network. Online newspaper operations in the top 25 media markets drew 83.7 million unique visitors in April 2010, up 10 percent from March, 12 percent from February, and 15 percent from January, Media Post reported.

Total page views in April reached more than two billion, compared to 1.6 billion page views in January.

The top 10 markets gained the number of unique visitors by 15 percent from 61.5 million in January to 70.8 million in April. Total page views boosted 27 percent from 1.1 billion to 1.4 billion. This outperformed the total U.S. Internet market, as Internet population, according to comScore, only increased 2 percent from 209 million to 213 million over the same period. Total page views of the whole market grew 6 percent from 533.6 billion to 567.3 billion, according to Media Week.

Moreover, newspaper sites reported bigger percentage increases than competitors including CNN.com and Huffington Post, which unique visitors stayed flat at about 43.4 million and dropped 3 percent from 22.8 million to 22.2 million, respectively.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-05-25 23:03

The ongoing discussion regarding the future of newspapers in a world of online aggregation veered into familiar territory yesterday, when a prominent editor said the world's chief search engine pushed online newsreading promiscuity.

Wall Street Journal Managing Editor Robert Thomson said co-panelist, Google Vice President for Search Products Marissa Mayer, "unintentionally encourages promiscuity," during day two of the Web 2.0 conference held this week in San Francisco, Agence France-Presse reported today.

Also on the panel were New York Times Chairman Arthur Sulzberger, Jr., and Huffington Post CEO Eric Hippeau. Sulzberger accused the Huffington Post of all-too-often engaging in copyright infringement, but was generally happy with Google's work, Search Engine Land reported yesterday.

In response to Sulzberger's assessment, Thomson was quoted by Search Engine Land as saying: "There are people who create things and people who reverberate them," calling both Google and Huffington Post reverberators.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-10-22 18:03

Google often touts the massive traffic it drives to newspaper Web sites - 1 billion click throughs from Google News per month. But what if that traffic is all but worthless?

That was the heart of the debate today in the opening session of the 2015 Newsroom Conference, organised by the World Editors Forum at PPF Media's Futuroom complex in Prague. Santiago de la Mora, head of print content partnerships for Google News in Europe, cited the massive traffic figure. But Matt Kelly, associate editor of the Daily Mirror and mirror.co.uk, questions its value.

"Some of our competitors have 30 million unique users a month, and you would think that any business that has 30 million unique users would be the happiest in the world. But they're not. They're worried," Kelly said.

The reason is simple: Users have been trained by Google and by the "cheap worthless technological news solutions out there" to graze many different websites for content with no value going back to the creator of that content. "Often they have no idea which website provided the information they found interesting." And, as a consequence, advertisers are not interested because there is no real audience in the traditional sense.

But Kelly doesn't blame Google for what he calls "parasitic consumption."

Author

Larry Kilman's picture

Larry Kilman

Date

2009-10-01 18:15

Syndicate content

© 2014 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation