Date

Tue - 26.09.2017


World Newspaper Congress

The World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers (WAN-IFRA) has been forced to call off the World Newspaper Congress and postpone the World Editors Forum, planned for Beirut from 7 to 10 June next, due to the failure of the Lebanese host organisation to meet its financial commitments.

"It is with immense disappointment that we are forced to call off our events in Beirut, but it was simply impossible to go ahead without the commitment of our Lebanese colleagues, who were responsible for security and other significant infrastructural and service expenses," said Gavin O'Reilly, President of WAN-IFRA. "We deeply regret that we cannot bring these events to Lebanon, particularly as this will cause immense inconvenience for our members, but this is not feasible without a local partner."

The local host, An-Nahar newspaper, has just informed WAN-IFRA that it was unable to provide the agreed funds to meet its obligations in the aftermath of the 2009 financial, economic and political crisis in the region. The cost of the venue, security and other local expenses was estimated to be 1.6 million euros and could not be covered by registration fees alone.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-11 18:24

The senior vice president and chief legal council of Google, Inc. and the CEO of Independent News & Media, plc, today agreed to disagree on the best way to protect content owners' copyrights on the Internet. However, INM's Gavin O'Reilly and Google's David Drummond did tell the audience of the World Newspaper Congress in Hyderabad they would continue meeting in the future to try and solve the issue.

O'Reilly argued that the current Robots Exclusion Protocol, or robots.txt, is outdated, saying publishers "need something more than essentially a binary 'yes/no' for the management and commercial exploitation of our valuable content." The answer, he said, is an updated standard like the Automated Content Access Protocol, an effort backed by the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers that seeks to give publishers a better way to control their copyrighted content online.

Drummond, left, discusses copyright protection on the Web with O'Reilly, left. Photo: Brian Powers, Western Integrated Media

ACAP may or may not be the right technical answer for the Web, but if nothing else, it sets up a starting point. It's something that should be welcomed by the content aggregators," O'Reilly said.

Drummond said robots.txt is honoured by all legitimate search engines, and gives publishers tremendous control over how content is shown in searches

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-04 01:46

Stella Dawson, Reuters global editor for treasury, told the World Editors Forum about how Reuters both provides newspapers with outsourcing solutions and runs its own off-shore operation.

"Outsourcing is not anything new" in the news industry, she said. For years, newspapers have been outsourcing production of some news to wires such as Reuters. What Reuters has been doing recently, however, is trying to find "customised solutions," rather than just giving all newspapers the same selection of articles to choose from.

For more on this article, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-03 09:45

People are willing to pay for online news, according to a recent study of 11 countries in North America, Europe and Australia, a senior manager from PricewaterhouseCoopers in the Netherlands told the World Newspaper Congress in Hyderabad today. When asked the question, "If there are no free alternatives, are you willing to pay for an online newspaper?" consumers said they are willing to pay 62 percent of the price of a traditional paper.

"This means there must be a possibility for newspaper companies to develop a proposition for your audience that is economically viable. Of course, if there are still free alternatives, it will be quite hard to do so. But if you have a good proposition, it certainly is possible to get paid for an online proposition," said Marieke van der Donk, senior manager of entertainment and media.

Marieke van der Donk, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Photo: Brian Powers, Western Integrated Media

When it comes to financial news, the value proposition is even higher. The same survey found that people are willing to pay 98 percent of what they pay for a traditional paper, or 98 cents on the euro or dollar. For sports, the number is 77 percent, she said."If you have relevant premium content, and it's not available elsewhere, consumers are willing to pay for it. Our research has proven that," she said, adding that hard news is very hard to charge consumers for.

She also pointed out it is important to "have your strategy in place" and to be "very clear in your subscription model."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-03 07:00

Creating a good brand is done through leadership, Ravi Dhariwal, CEO of Bennet, Coleman & Co., which publishes The Times of India told this afternoon's session of the World Newspaper Congress in Hyderabad. Speakers discussed how their businesses make money, while remaining credible and effective and still incredibly popular - through print.

Dhariwal and his company have made The Times of India a brand rather than just a newspaper through extensive marketing and interactivity. Establishing The Times as a cheerleader for the country was a key part of this branding strategy, along with keeping it "virtually free" for everyone.

Publisher and Editor in Chief of the newly launched 'i,' a daily newspaper in Portugal, Martim Figueiredo, says the newspaper sees costs of about 8 million euro and 4.5 million euro in profits, and will lose nearly 3.5 million euros in its first year of operation. However, with the advertising and reader response so far and despite heavy challenges, he envisions a break-even in 2014. The newspaper is targeting a high class, sophisticated audience, which also appeals to advertisers.

"We are not so much worrying about our future; we'd like to think we are making our future. I couldn't find one publisher in Australia that would accept that its product is going to die." This was the message from Mark Hollands, CEO of PANPA (Pacific Area Newspaper Publishers' Association) in Australia.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-02 12:37

Snowballing multimedia trends are being harnessed by different companies in different ways to grow new revenue streams and better serve audiences, speakers told the third session of the World Newspaper Congress today.

Bharat Gupta, chairman, managing director and managing editor of Jagran Prakashan in India told the congress about "the making of the world's highest read newspaper." Sandy Prieto-Romualdez, president and CEO of the Philippine Daily Inquirer, told about her newspaper's mobile-centric publishing strategy that capitaizes on the fact that Filipinos are among the most prolific phone texters in the world.

The newspaper has 55 million daily readers. Gupta described a print strategy that focused on building relationships with readers, with respecting the competition, with starting afresh with each new edition and not assuming what works in one place will work in another. Every market is unique and calls for a different approach.

"Dainik Jagran's content is changed to reflect the colloquial tastes of every local market," he said.

Mobile advertising represents only 1 percent of company revenues, but Prieto-Romualdez predicted this will change as soon as next year, thanks to two new technologies that are now being introduced.

One allows readers to use their mobile phone cameras to take a picture of an icon in the print newspaper and have instant access to video associated with the story. "It allows the paper to be more interactive and gives the reader wider engagement in the news," she said.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-02 12:02

John Paton, impreMedia Chairman and CEO, spoke about re-inventing newspaper companies for the new news ecology at the Newspapers: A Multi-Media, Growth Business session this morning at the 62nd World Newspaper Congress in Hyderabad.

The Spanish-language newspaper audience in the United States is booming - it is the country's fastest growing demographic and would be the world's third largest Spanish speaking country if it stood alone.

John Paton, impreMedia Chairman and CEO. Photo: Brian Powers, Western Integrated MediaimpreMedia, a 6-year-old company that has acquired the most reputable Spanish language newspapers in the U.S., some of which are nearly a century old, is growing along with its readers.

"Don't get me wrong here, I believe newspaper companies have a very bright future but as news companies where print is only one of many products and where each builds audience for the others," he said, giving the following advice:

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-02 11:40

More than a dozen reports from 2008-2009 were presented and analyzed by Indian freelance journalist Sridala Swami from WAN-IFRA's Shaping the Future of the Newspaper project.

She detailed the relationship between growing technologies and monetization. Editorial content management systems can enhance quality, reduce costs, ease the use of blogging, social networking, and sharing. Newspapers by their nature already have print, and they also have access to online, so the real opportunity is to intergrate and "get a lot more bang for your buck."

François Nel, director of Journalism Leadership Programmes at the University of Central Lancashire in the United Kingdom. Photo: Brian Powers, Western Integrated Media

Many newspapers have been outsourcing much of their work to other countries, including their advertising, to reduce costs. For outsourcing to succeed, publishers should analyze the proccesses of each of their departments in order to to clearly identify which functions are appropriate to outsource. Newspapers that are growing are focusing on strengthening credibility and audience focus. Media audiences crave content that is tailored to them which can be discovered through reader research and by combining consumer databases.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-02 07:00

A UK Tabloid is not focusing on search engine optimisation for their Web site, but rather on human interests.

During the WAN-IFRA 2009 World Newspaper Congress - World Editors Forum, Associate Editor of the Daily Mirror, Matt Kelly, said by seeking big audiences, we have devalued the content in the minds of users. Users, not readers, customers or viewers, find content in a search engine and devour it and repeat the process like locusts, he said.

For more on this story, visit our partner site, the Editors Weblog.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2009-12-02 07:00

The first session of the World Newspaper Congress kicked off today with talk of perhaps the biggest ongoing conversation amongst the media around the world: how to pay for the digital content the news industry creates.

Les Hinton, CEO of Dow Jones & Co., told the Congress that charging for online news is a must, and companies need to find more ways to improve their ad sales to survive. Paul Jansen, CEO of SPH search at Singapore Press Holdings, said his biggest mistake was initially going free in the infancy of the Web. Andreas Wiele, of Axel Springer AG in Germany, said the industry must come up with models to allow print to measure efficiency, or advertisers will "go away."

Les Hinton, CEO of Dow Jones & Co.
Photo: Brian Powers, Western Integrated Media
Righting past mistakes

The media industry must completely reinvent itself to increase productivity, quality and profits, Hinton said. Charging for online news is a must and companies need to find more ways to improve their advertisement sales to survive.

Author

Shakia Harris

Date

2009-12-01 23:25

Syndicate content

© 2015 WAN-IFRA - World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers

Footer Navigation