Date

Tue - 29.07.2014


March 2010

Individual news sources, including online newspaper sites, beat others as the top method for how news readers access online news, with 48 percent, according to Outsell. Specific news portals came next with 35 percent, and then search engines, with 11 percent, the latest SFN's report, New Revenue Models for Newspaper Companies, reported.

Power news users, compared to regular news users, tend to access online news through specific news portals more, but not search engines.

Links to e-mailed stories, RSS feeds and links to stories through social networks only accounted for a very small portion, according to the report, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Click here to download our free mini report, Paid vs. Free Content Debate.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-03-31 23:22

A new voluntary code of practice was signed by the Australian sports administrative authorities and leading media groups to resolve disputes between the groups that have gone on for years. Ongoing disputes and press coverage boycotts have centred over restrictions sports administrations had created which previously blocked news agencies from covering cricket and Australian Rules Football matches, Agence France-Presse reported today.

This new code is likely the first of its kind, and ends several restrictions the sports administration had placed on the media, such as not allowing the use of sports news and images online, including the number of updates on the events and the sites allowed to use sports images. They also aimed to restrict sports coverage on mobile platforms. Many media groups believed to be the restrictions to infringe on press freedom, and those that did not agree to them were not allowed to cover certain events.

The new code offers media groups the ability to cover sports events while also assuring sports organisations that photographs or text taken at the events will not be used for any commercial purposes beyond news reporting, according to AFP.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-03-30 23:59

Agora SA, the largest publisher in Poland, announced it will buy Centrum Filmowe Helios SA, the third-biggest cinema operator in the country, in order to reduce dependence on the newspaper advertising market, Bloomberg reported.

According to the company's e-mailed statement Tuesday, Agora signed a preliminary agreement to acquire 84 percent of Helios for 25 million euros, or US$34 million.

"We are entering the cinema market, which has significant growth potential. Compared with other European Union countries, Poland has relatively low per capita ticket sales," said Agora Deputy Chief Executive Officer Zbigniew Bak in the statement. "

Agora, which publishes the nation's leading non-tabloid daily, had suffered from the declining advertising and circulation, but it has tried to focus on the Internet and other non-print media, and have already seen some successes, according to the Reuters articles posted on Interactive Investor.

According to UniCredit analyst Przemyslaw Sawala-Uryasz, "This means entering a market far less correlated with the media and advertising markets. I do not see this as a move to broaden the advertising base but as a move to diversify revenue."

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-03-30 22:52

Swiss publishing group Ringier and German publisher Axel Springer will consolidate their Eastern European operations into one company, Newspaper Innovation reported last week.

The companies will combine their operations in Poland, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Serbia, and create a new company to be headquartered in Zurich, according to the IFRA blog, a partner site of SFN.

The operation will include more than 100 print titles, 34 of which are newspapers, according to Newspaper Innovation.

The 50-50 partnership will see Axel Springer contributing to its subsidiaries in Poland, the Czech Republic and Hungary, while Ringier's operations in Slovakia, the Czech Republic, Serbia and Hungary will be brought to the group.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-30 22:31

John Yemma, the editor of The Christian Science Monitor, had some strong words for newspaper websites in an article he wrote for PaidContent: neither paywalls nor multimedia content will save you.

Although Yemma believes that content is king, no news organisation has formulated an appropriate response to the problem of losing the value of content on the Internet. Erecting paywalls, like the ones News Corp and the New York Times will in the near future, is just like "sandbagging the tops of levies on the Mississipi," but they are not the answer. Paywalls can't hold the flood back, and the "Internet flood never recedes."

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-30 22:12

Two of Britain's top-selling newspapers will start charging for online content beginning in June.

The Times and The Sunday Times made the announcement Friday. Readers will be charged £2 for a week's subscription, or £1 for a day's access to two new sites, thetimes.co.uk and sundaytimes.co.uk. Existing subscribers to the print editions will be given free online access, according to Times Online.

Rupert Murdoch, chairman and chief executive of News Corporation, parent company of The Times, announced in August plans to charge for online content on all of the company's newspaper Web sites.

Rebekah Brooks, chief executive of News International - a British division of News Corp. - said this of the announcement in a statement Friday: "This is a crucial step towards making the business of news an economically exciting proposition. We are proud of our journalism and unashamed to say that we believe it has value."

News International, which includes The Sun, The Times, The Sunday Times and News of the World, said in a statement that The Times and The Sunday Times would introduce new Web sites in early May, separating their online content from a combined site for the first time.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-30 02:30

Following USA Today's move to newsstands inside Starbucks coffee shops, The Wall Street Journal today announced its availability for purchase at 450 local Starbucks stores in the New York area, according to a Dow Jones press release, out today.

The Journal will also be available in the shops in certain parts of New Jersey, Connecticut and Pennsylvania. The New York Times was the first national U.S. newspaper to be distributed at Starbucks, with USA Today joining the coffee chain's distribution network at 6,500 Starbucks outlets across the country earlier this month. The distribution of The Journal at Starbucks is expected to coincide with the launch of its New York edition in April, Editor & Publisher reported.

"This strategic relationship is consistent with the Journal's plan to target New Yorkers, especially with the upcoming new section that will debut next month," Lynne Brennen, senior vice president of circulation for The Journal, stated in the press release. "The targeted distribution across New York area Starbucks stores allows us to serve our readers and is another platform for customers to sample its broad array of coverage."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-03-30 01:39

BBC has postponed the launch of its mobile applications, after newspapers showed concern about direct competition, Reuters reported.

The Newspaper Publishers Association had requested the BBC's governing body, the BBC Trust, to examine the proposals.

"It is vital that these proposals are scrutinised properly to avoid any adverse impact on commercial media organizations," the NPA's director, David Newell said Monday. "We are pleased that the BBC Trust has listened to the industry's concerns and acted to delay the planned April launch."

In February, the BBC announced its plan to launch specially tailored applications for iPhones and other high-end mobiles, which enable access to BBC news and sport, according to a Press Association article posted by Google.

The BBC Trust will now investigate the proposals. However, no timetable was given, Reuters reported.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-03-30 00:35

Independent News and Media last week unveiled premium content across its 13 regional newspaper Web sites in Ireland.

The newspapers will continue carrying a considerable amount of free content across the newspaper Web sites, Patrick Lenehan, CTO of Independent Digital, told SFN. The non-newspaper sourced content was built up over the past 18 months.

Newspapers now under the freemium model include: the Kerryman, Corkman, Sligo Champion, Drogheda Independent, Fingal Independent, The Argus, Bray People, Carlow People, Enniscorthy Guardian, Gorey Guardian, New Ross Standard, Wicklow People and Wexford People.

"This is very much a trial. There are no plans to launch across our national newspaper brands (e.g. Independent.ie) as the national newspaper Web sites perform very well with an advertising supported model - in fact they are market leaders commercially," Lenehan stated in an e-mail.

The launch of the new freemium model was showcased to print readers with a full-page colour ad in each regional newspaper. The ad included a letter from the editor and information detailing which content would be paid, and which would be free.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-30 00:32

Online search and e-mail are the two most popular online activities in Europe, which 84 percent and 79 percent of respondents in 2007, respectively, performed at least once a month, according to EIAA.

The figures rose to 87 percent and 81 percent in 2008. More than 40 percent of respondents used online social networking at least once a month, while more than three out of 10 used instant messaging, listened to Web radio, downloaded music or watched movies/videos in 2008, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

According to BIGresearch SIMM 13 Study, shopping and weather were the top two online activities for fun and entertainment among U.S. online users, with 38 percent and 35 percent of respondents saying they regularly did so, respectively.

Checking movie reviews/schedules, viewing photos from friends, checking sport news and scores and playing video games were also popular; more than two out of 10 regularly did one of those activities, according to the report, World Digital Media Trends 2009, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-03-26 22:45

The San Francisco Chronicle has entered into a content sharing agreement with Bloomberg and will expand its daily business news section, the California daily reported yesterday.

The new daily business section, called "Business Report," will be produced jointly by the Chronicle staff and the Bloomberg news team. Beginning Sunday, it will feature stories drafted by Chronicle reporters and content from the Bloomberg news service, in both the print edition of the Chronicle and Web sites of both groups, the San Francisco Business Journal reported. Financial details about the deal have not been disclosed by either party.

According to the Chronicle, the collaboration is the first of its kind in the United States, with Bloomberg producing stories, graphics and photos specifically for the Chronicle, along with data packages that focus on Bay Area's largest industries that include technology, biotechnology and financial services.

"By working with Bloomberg, the world's largest and most trusted information source for business news and reporting, we intend the Chronicle's daily business section to be an essential read for business, financial and technology coverage of Silicon Valley and the Bay Area," Frank Vega, Chronicle Chairman and Publisher stated in a press release.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-03-26 20:33

Advertising revenue at U.S. newspapers was down more than 27 percent last year, as both print and online saw declines in the double digits, according to figures released by the Newspaper Association of America on Wednesday, Agence France Presse reported today.

Print advertising was down 28.6 percent, to $24.82 billion, while online was down 11.8 percent to $2.74 billion. Combined, revenue fell 27.2 percent to $27.56 billion, compared to $37.84 billion in 2008.

Perhaps even worse, the drop last year shows an acceleration in decline for the year-over-year period, Editor & Publisher pointed out. The decline from 2005 to 2006 was 1.7 percent, in 2007 the decline was 9.4 percent and in 2008 the decline was 17.7 percent.

The scale of damage "is stunning," New York Times media writer Richard Perez-Pena stated. "The last time advertisers spent less on newspapers was in 1986."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-26 19:47

Le Monde announced Tuesday that, starting March 29, it will be offering a new subscription package encompassing all media on which the top French newspaper is offered. Currently, the site offers free access to much of its online content, articles from that day's print newspaper, which are relegated to a subscription-only archive the next day, and there is a free iPhone

The move comes as part of an effort to create what application, which has received over 1.4 million downloads to date. Upon the implementation of a paywall, Le Monde's print edition will no longer be available online to anyone but web subscribers.Eric Fotterino, CEO of Le Monde, calls a "global brand."

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-26 19:21

Russian billionaire and former KGB agent Alexander Lebedev has bought the Independent and Independent on Sunday for just £1 from Irish publishing group Independent News & Media, MediaGuardian reported today.

Lebedev has created the company Independent Print Limited to publish the titles. As part of the deal, INM will pay the company £9.25 million over the next 10 months, and in exchange IPL will take on "all future trading liabilities and obligations." The acquisition is expected to be completed in May.

According to the Dublin-based INM, which owns newspapers in several countries, the Independent print titles and corresponding Web site Independent.co.uk had an operating loss of more than £12.4 million last year, according to the Guardian. This week, the company reported a net loss of €87.8 million for 2009 and a 15 percent decrease in revenue, to €1.25 billion, the Wall Street Journal reported today.

"It would have cost Independent News about £30 million to shut down the money-losing paper, a person close to the matter said," the WSJ article stated.

In January last year, Lebedev bought a 75.1 percent stake in the London Evening Standard for a token £1, due to that newspaper's loss-making status as well.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-26 02:12

Outliving expectations from the newspaper industry, The Moscow Times plans to become a full colour publication from April, Newspaper Innovation reported yesterday.

Remarking its 17-year history as the longest surviving free European English daily, the publication aims to promote its colour version, by advertising in the print and online versions of its newspaper with a hope to increase readership, promote loyalty and maximise advertising opportunities by adding an emotional element to its photographs, Independent Media Russia reported.

Being distributed at hotels and business centers, the circulation of the newspaper is around 35,000, according to Newspaper Innovation. The free daily was initially launched by Independent Media and later sold to Finnish publisher, Sanoma. Users can still access and download the black and white version of the newspaper after registering on its Web site.

An event showcasing best journalistic photographs by the publication's photographers will be held at the Kofemania café on Bolshaya Nikitskaya street, as a unique continuation of the redesigned paper launch campaign efforts.

With an aim to increase readership and promote loyalty, many programmes have been developed to retain existing customers and attract new ones with favourable subscription offers, Independent Media Russia reported.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-03-26 01:37

The Wall Street Journal said it plans to charge US$17.99 for a monthly subscription on the iPad, citing unidentified people familiar with the matter, Bloomberg reported.

It "seems an awful lot considering it doesn't need to be printed or delivered," according to the British Web site Unbeatable.

However, "it's at least 10 bucks cheaper than a monthly subscription to the dead trees version, so WSJ readers will see it as a bargain I'm sure," an article on the Web site Gizmodo stated.

Compared to other publications offering the same services, Esquire Magazine's first iPad issue will charge $2 less than its printed version, while Men's Health Magazine will ask for the same price ($4.99) as its physical issue.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-03-25 23:24

Spot.Us, the California-based community-funded journalism site, is looking at new business models, it was reported in eMedia Vitals. Spot.Us allows the public to fund the stories they want: freelance journalists submit pitches or readers provide tips, a price is set for the story and Spot.Us enables the public donation process.

At the SXSW technology festival, Spot.Us founder David Cohn suggested that he was planning to offer readers alternative ways to fund stories, according to eMedia Vitals. As well as donating cash, readers could perform some kind of advertising-related task for a company such as filling out a survey, taking a quiz or watching a video, and then be awarded credits which they could put towards funding stories.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-25 23:03

Will consumers pay for online news and entertainment contents that are now free? According to a recent Nielsen survey which covered more than 27,000 consumers across 52 countries, 85 percent said they would like free content remain free, the latest SFN's report, New Revenue Models for Newspaper Companies, reported.

The survey was conducted during the autumn of 2009, covering nations in five geographical regions, including the Asia Pacific region, Europe, Middle East/Africa/Pakistan (MEAP), Latin America and North America.

When asked if free online content should remain free, the majority (85 percent) of all the respondents said they strongly agree or agree, while only a small group expressed their disagreement, according to the Nielsen report "Changing Models: A Global Perspective on Paying for Content Online," released in February 2010.

To break down by region, Latin Americans had the highest percentage of respondents saying they "agree" or "strongly agree," with more than nine out of 10 saying so.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-03-24 23:08

UK daily The Sun has launched a new print and outdoor advertising campaign touting its columnists and its lower cover price in the south east region, MarketingWeek reported yesterday.

The campaign was designed to promote the News International tabloid's lower cover price of 20 pence, down from 30 pence, as well as to capture the different writing styles of its columnists, according to MarketingWeek. Each ad features an iconic portrait photograph of a columnist along with a short tagline that reflects that writer's unique style.

The promotional pricing offered by The Sun puts pressure on its rivals, The Daily Mirror, priced at 45p and The Daily Star at 20p, according to MediaWeek. While circulation revenues are declining overall for the UK newspaper industry, the News International tile aims to increase its readership by offering promotional pricing in different regions. The latest slash in cover price will be seen in the Central TV region encompassing Birmingham and Oxford, with the title priced at 20p from 30p.

However, the time span for this aggressive promotional pricing strategy remains indefinite.

The daily has seen a fall in circulation, thrice over the past 4 months below the 3million mark, and the recent ABC audit for February indicates a circulation decline by 3.6 percent to 2,972,763, MediaWeek reported.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-03-24 22:12

A federal court yesterday temporarily lifted rules that do not allow media companies from owning both a newspaper and a broadcast television station in the same U.S. market, The Associated Press reported.

The Federal Communications Commission's "cross-ownership" ban is being reviewed along with other rules as part of the FCC's congressionally mandated review of media ownership rules. The rule was last issued a stay by the court in 2003.

Since the 1970s, regulations have stopped single companies from owning a newspaper and either a radio or TV station in one of the nation's top 20 markets, the New York Post reported. The FCC has been considering relaxing the rules since 2003, and in 2007 the court allowed several changes to the rule.

"The lifting of the stay on the Commission's very modest relaxation of the newspaper/broadcast cross-ownership rule is particularly appropriate given the economic upheaval affecting the ongoing viability of many daily newspapers and broadcast stations. I also believe that the Commission can only benefit from instruction of a Third Circuit ruling on the 2007 ownership rules as we begin the next round of the statutorily required quadrennial review of the regulations," said FCC Commissioner Robert McDowell, according to Radio Business Report.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-24 22:04

On Monday, Google officially removed its search site from Chinese servers, submerging the country in a partial Google blackout much sooner than expected

The company still hosts some Google services, such as Google Docs and Google News, in China, but it has moved its search operations off the mainland to Hong Kong. Because of China's "One Country, Two Systems" policy, Hong Kong has many of its own laws, which don't include the censorship requirements that the Beijing government has imposed upon Google. When Chinese users on the mainland attempt to go to Google.cn, they are directed to Google.co.hk, which aims to bypass those requirements. and drawing both outrage and praise for the act.

For more on this story, visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-24 20:23

USA Today launched a new trade ad campaign with the theme "What America Wants" yesterday to highlights its connection with readers, BtoBonline reported.

The new multimedia trade campaign targets advertisers and media buyers by emphasising the continued leadership of Gannett Co.'s flagship newspaper in establishing a connection with readers, and aims to position USA Today as "The Nation's Newspaper" by creating value for its advertisers, according to its press release. The "What America Wants" campaign focuses on the newspapers' "balanced and unpretentious reporting" on issues important to Americans, Editor & Publisher reported.

"While other media brands like to claim that they are telling their readers what they think they should know, USA Today prides itself on writing about what our readers actually want to know," David L. Hunke, president and publisher of USA Today, told E&P.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-03-24 00:23

Worldwide, bloggers have reached 184 million people, according to Universal McCann in March 2008, while 26.4 million of them were from United States. Additionally, there were 346 million people worldwide who read blogs, or 77 percent of active Internet users, 60.3 million of which came from the United States, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

According to comScore's data in August 2008, there were 77.7 million unique visitors in the United States, out of the total 188.9 million online population.

eMarketer's data shows that in May 2008, there were 94.1 million U.S. blog readers, or half of the Internet users. The number of bloggers reached 22.6 million, which represents 12 percent of all online users, according to the report, World Digital Media Trends 2009, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-03-23 23:25

Fifteen percent of people surveyed said they are "seriously considering" buying an iPad in the next three months - a slightly higher number than those saying they will buy an Amazon Kindle, according to a new report by comScore. Meanwhile, of the consumers who currently own an iPhone or iPod Touch are "more than twice as willing to pay for newspaper and magazine subscriptions formatted for e-readers" than those who don't own either device, according to the report, PoynterOnline reported today.

The April 3 release of the iPad is pushing publishers to quickly develop new strategies for the device, with more than 27,000 book apps in Apple's App Store at the last count, the Sydney Morning Herald reported. However, Fairfax Media's marketing and newspaper sales director told the SMH that finding a market for an app isn't as easy as it may seem.

"It's clear at this early stage that the people who succeed with apps will be those who can provide major exposure in other media outlets to generate awareness to generate the sales," Robert Whitehead told the SMH. "With 150,000 apps on the App store, for example, they don't just sell themselves."

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-03-23 19:21


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