WAN-IFRA

Shaping the Future of the Newspaper

Date

Mon - 24.11.2014


May 2010

According to the latest data released by the Audit Bureau of Circulations Electronic, Mail Online stayed on the top as the most visited UK newspaper Web site in April, Media Guardian reported.

Associated Newspapers' Web site network had more than 2.3 million combined average daily browsers in April, up 5.33 percent month-over-month and 74.5 percent year-over-year.

Mail Online was also the first newspaper website in the country to reach 40 million monthly uniques in April, Media Guardian reported.

The second spot went to Guardian.co.uk again, with more than 1.8 million average daily browsers. Telegraph.co.uk was ranked third, with just under 1.6 million.

News International eschewed its websites from the ABCe audit last month, as the content from the Times and Sunday Times will go behind a paywall in June, followed by the Sun and News of the World later.

Most newspaper Web sites now use daily visitor numbers on average as the headline measurement figure, as it seems to be more representative than a monthly user figure, according to Media Guardian.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-05-31 18:27

Israel's ministerial legislative committee is scheduled to vote on a bill this week that, if passed, would only allow newspapers to be published for free for one year, Newspaper Innovation reported. "...it is clear that the bill is aimed at Israel Today, which is considered to be very close to Prime Minister [Benjamin] Netanyahu," the report stated.

The proposal, put forth by MK Marina Solodkin, is called "Prohibition on Distributing Newspapers Free." The bill's objective is to block Israel Today's distribution.

Israel Today is owned by Sheldon Adelson, "a very close associate" of the prime minister and his wife, Globes Online reported. Its print run has continued to increase from "255,000 copies last week to 279,000 copies on Sunday, to 291,000 copies on Monday, and to 301,000 copies on Tuesday and Wednesday," the article stated.

The freesheet is distributed in trains and other commuter locations.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-31 16:35

Glamour, the popular glossy magazine for women, is relaunching its Web site after completing an overhaul of its operations, MediaWeek.co.uk reported today. Like other recent news content relaunches, the new online version is aimed to be more cohesive with the print version, while also making the best of enhancements made possible by being digital.

"This redesign offers greater synergy with the tone and character of the print magazine, and will deliver on all the expectations of our readers, offering unbeatable fashion, shopping, beauty and hair content - no one will make style decisions without our help again!" Jo Elvin, editor of Glamour, owned by Condé Nast, told MediaWeek.
The changes introduced on the newly designed Web site include large scale visuals, eight content channels for fashion, shopping, beauty and hair, celebrity, style, blogs, introduction of an e-commerce element and a new section called "Do's and Don'ts."

"The release of this new version of Glamour.com highlights our ongoing programme of investment, including a significant increase in the editorial team," Emanuela Pignataro, country manager for the Condé Nast Digital Britain group told MediaWeek. The re-launch of Glamour.com marks the fourth significant investment by the group in just more than a year, beginning with redesign of Wired.co.uk in April 2009, soon followed by CNNtraveller.com at the end of last year and GQ.com in February.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-31 15:16

The "will it or won't it" debate surrounding whether the iPad will "save" the newspaper industry has been going on since news of its possible existence in Apple's labs surfaced last year. It is still being discussed today, as the iPad is launched in some European countries, Japan, Canada and Australia.

Although other tablet computers, such as Amazon's Kindle, have been on the market for years, they have been mostly focused on reading books in black and white, with few other features or capabilities. The iPad is unique because it creates a new market segment in the gap between laptops and mobiles, CNN blogs noted today.

The new segment created by the iPad gives newspapers a chance to start fresh with readers, many believe, enabling them to charge for their content, a move many wish they would have had the foresight to do in the early days of the Internet. It also creates a new level of interactivity for both content and advertisements, allowing news publishers to give users a more enriched experience in exchange.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-28 18:17

Zimbabwe is celebrating a victory for press freedom, as the government decides to issue licenses to four new dailies, CNN reported. Those titles include the "Daily News," which was previously banned in 2002. These papers will be the first privately owned in the market in six years.

"This is very exciting and it's a huge time for Zimbabweans and it's an opportunity for change," Trevor Ncube, one of the most powerful publishers in southern Africa, talked about the approval of the newspaper license to CNN.

Photo: The Daily Maverick

"We're clearly in a period of transition and this newspaper will play a role to empower Zimbabweans," he added.

The Zimbabwe Media Commission (ZMC) was formed in December 2009, in order to spearhead media reforms, such as licensing new press, radio and TV outlets, BBC News reported.

Currently, the market is dominated by state-run media, while the independent press faces severe restrictions.

"We are here to allow Zimbabweans access to media," according to Reuters news agency quoting ZMC's chairman Godfrey Majonga.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-05-28 17:20

IT magazine Computerworld unveiled a new look on Monday, featuring a "clean, modern and functional design," a press release announced. The Web site's look is very basic, yet easy to maneuver.

Many publishers have recently set out to redesign their publications, in both print and online, to enhance reader and user experiences. These include Newsweek, thetimes.co.uk and sundaytimes.co.uk, Macleans and more.

When redesigning, thinking of the user experience is of utmost importance, newspaper design expert Juan Antonio Giner noted on his innovationsinnewspapers.com blog. Using the example of the Independent, he calls for "less hype, less spin and just the (graphic) facts, baby."

News should be "show, don't tell," and in print, front pages sitting in newsstands should be made irresistible to readers, Giner states, calling it "caviar journalism."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-28 17:11

With today's introduction of Apple's iPad to Europe and parts of Asia, a slew of applications have appeared on the market to deliver information directly into the hands of iPad users. The iPad, Apple's much-anticipated version of a tablet computer, has the capacity to download applications, programs designed by third parties which iPad users can download for free or pay a typically low price. Given the popularity of the iPad, news sources have been quick to take advantage of the direct communication that the iPad provides.

In particular, Thomson Reuters has produced two different iPad applications, which the company hopes will increase news consumption. Meanwhile, Condé Nast Publications has recently developed a completely new version of their Wired magazine specifically designed for iPad.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-28 16:19

Daily Mail and General Trust Plc reported a profit for the fiscal first half of the year, due to cutting costs in its newspaper unit and asset sales, Bloomberg reported today.

The publisher of the Daily Mail newspaper's net income in the six months up to April 4 was £92.7 million, compared to a loss of £172.9 million in the first half of last year, the company announced in a statement. Adjusted operating profit was £144 million, which beat market expectations of £142 million, the Irish Times noted.

Image: the Daily Mail
The increase is also partly due to improving advertising trends in Britain, which is hoped will lead to growth in the second half.

"Whilst we remain cautious about the outlook, particularly in the UK, we are increasingly well positioned to weather current economic uncertainties and to take advantage of improved conditions as they materialise," the company stated, according to the Irish Times.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-28 00:16

The Irish News has turned its paywall technology into a revenue generating opportunity by selling it to other news publishers, Journalism.co.uk reported yesterday.

The page-turning service was developed in-house, and the Belfast-based regional title is offering to sell other publishers a subscription and digital edition service as product packages. Starting at £465, the service includes server resources, bandwidth and video streaming for digital editions.
"When the paper was available for free, apart from the cost of running the website, we were losing readers of the paid for paper to the free online model, which was economic madness. Now readers have a clear and equitable choice, pay for a printed newspaper or pay for the same paper online," Liam McMullen, systems and resource manager, told Journalism.co.uk. He also noted that creating their own in-house paywall technology has helped the group to have greater control over the product and offer more a customised personal service to its readers.

The service has so far been well received by its readers and the newspaper has no plans to bring down its paywall and re-introduce free content, McMullen told Journalism.co.uk. He added that the newspaper isn't stopping there with its technology, and will continue to try and serve advertisers better by targeting advertising around news on its Web site, and optimising potentials of the mobile medium.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-27 23:42

Ad revenue at U.S. newspapers was down 10 percent to US$6 billion in the first quarter, from $6.6 billion in the same period in 2009, according to the data released by the Newspaper Association of America.

It was the smallest drop since late 2007, according to the Associated Press article posted on USA Today.

Compared to $11.1 billion ad revenue in the first quarter four years ago, the newspaper industry is now 46 percent loss, the AP reported.

Although still in decline, the trend in the first quarter indicated that the misery should not last much longer - the year-over-year declines in ad revenue have eased in the last three quarters.

NAA also shows U.S. newspapers reported their first gain in online ad sales, up 4.9 percent to $730.4 million, while print advertising plunged 11 percent to $5.25 billion, according to the Bloomberg article posted on Business Week.

Internet ad sales had been a sweet spot for newspapers, which grew 30 percent or more since 2004.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-05-27 23:35

Last week, Yahoo! acquired Associated Content, a company with which Yahoo! had been developing a relationship for several months. Associated Content is a news source that provides localized articles through the contributions of mostly non-journalist individuals with knowledge of local information. Luke Beatty, founder of Associated Content, claims that AC's personalized style and Yahoo!'s incredible size allow for both news sources to be more effective when working together.

AC delivers to Yahoo! localized content that will hopefully provide more personalized content to Yahoo's 600 million users and allow it to gain a level of relevancy that could change the that way news is reported on the web. Meanwhile, Beatty claims that Yahoo!'s large audience will motivate his news contributors by giving them access to a larger audience. As part of the acquisition, Yahoo will be opening a new office in Denver.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-27 18:01

In 2008, U.S.-based publisher Hearst Corporation partnered with MediaEdge for a joint research initiative to learn more about how consumers felt about greener products, both in and out of the publishing world, SFN's Going Green reported.

Although the survey focused solely on magazines and not all print content, the results of the survey resonate for companies that publish quality content, especially newspapers. The environment is an important topic for readers, and content that explores that is valued.

Based on a 10-point scale where "10" meant "agree strongly" and "1" meant "disagree strongly," the majority of respondents overall, and women in particular, expressed high levels of interest and trust in green-related magazine content, the survey found.

Women value content that provides tips and advice on how to live a more eco-friendly lifestyle, with 68 percent of women saying they pay attention to these types of articles, and 48 percent of men saying so.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-05-26 23:40

Demand Media has entered into a partnership with Hearst Group to produce content for two of its publications, the San Francisco Chronicle and the Houston Chronicle, Erik Sherman reported last week in a Bnet.com article. The move, in which Demand will create articles and videos for SFGate.com's real estate section and Chron.com's small business section, advances the company's reach into traditional media.

Sherman reported that the normal rate offered by Demand for a few hundred words of outsourced article is US$7.50 to the writer and about $3.50 for copy editing, but Mike Taylor, an author on the MediaBistro Blog reported that Demand actually pays an average of $15 to $20 per article, with price variations depending on the kind of work and level of distribution. Demand pays $30 for videos.

"At Demand's current pay rate, I'd be making almost a buck an hour," The New York Times' David Carr wrote.

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-26 21:12

The economics of online journalism say that the more page views, the better, which many say can endanger important news that may be overlooked because it won't drive traffic. But as online ad revenues aren't adding up fast enough for many newspapers around the globe and paywalls and premium content offerings continue to go up, from the Nikkei in Japan to Le Monde in France, could the tide be turning in favour of this type of reporting?

"The management shouldn't be following but trying to anticipate the changing economics of online journalism," writes Silicon Valley Watcher blogger Tom Foremski, a former Financial Times journalist. "The dirty little secret of journalism's focus on page views is that the value of each page view is decreasing, because the value of online advertising is decreasing. This means it's a strategy that will likely lead to failure. Media organizations need to adopt a multi-revenue business model, or what I call a Heinz 57 model."

So if newspapers create paid content offerings, whether they're behind complete paywalls, a freemium model or partial paywall, quality journalism may win the day at traditional news outlets.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-26 21:01

In an interview yesterday with AllThingsDigital's Peter Kafka, New York Times spokeswoman Stacy Green attempted to allay concerns over the impact the NYT's forthcoming paywall on bloggers. A new study on news and social media from the Project for Excellence in Journalism shows that 80% of blog entries link to one of just four news sources: the BBC, CNN, The Washington Post and The New York Times. Thus if the NYT's proposed paywall shuts out bloggers, the newspaper stands to lose an enormous portion of its Web traffic.

In downplaying fears over a fundamental shift to a 'closed web', the NYT spokeswoman reiterated an explanation of the 'metered model' underlying the NYT paywall. In essence, users will be able to read a number of articles free of charge, and only after exceeding their quota will they be prompted to pay for content. Furthermore, surfers who arrive at a given article from a blog link will not have that session counted against them.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-26 19:09

U.S. newspaper sites continue to see increases Web traffic, according to the latest comScore figures released by the Newspaper National Network. Online newspaper operations in the top 25 media markets drew 83.7 million unique visitors in April 2010, up 10 percent from March, 12 percent from February, and 15 percent from January, Media Post reported.

Total page views in April reached more than two billion, compared to 1.6 billion page views in January.

The top 10 markets gained the number of unique visitors by 15 percent from 61.5 million in January to 70.8 million in April. Total page views boosted 27 percent from 1.1 billion to 1.4 billion. This outperformed the total U.S. Internet market, as Internet population, according to comScore, only increased 2 percent from 209 million to 213 million over the same period. Total page views of the whole market grew 6 percent from 533.6 billion to 567.3 billion, according to Media Week.

Moreover, newspaper sites reported bigger percentage increases than competitors including CNN.com and Huffington Post, which unique visitors stayed flat at about 43.4 million and dropped 3 percent from 22.8 million to 22.2 million, respectively.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-05-25 23:03

Online news aggregation and content distribution service Publish2 has announced the launch of a product it hopes will replace The Associated Press, or, as the company terms it, "Craigslist it." As in, "kill the AP's main income stream by offering an open, efficient alternative," TechCrunch explained yesterday.

The Publish2 News Exchange product, announced at TechCrunch's Disrupt conference, will aim to help publishers reduce content distribution costs associated with The AP for distributing high quality and free content from around the Web, VentureBeat.com reported. Instead of buying AP content, Publish2 would connect online publishers with print publishers, offering brand syndication alternatives to web publishers, while acting as a news aggregator for online journalists and bloggers.

The AP content distribution network is an "obsolete inefficient monopoly, ripe for disruption," Scott Karp, CEO of the News Exchange platform initiative wrote in a post on the Publish2 Web site. "The New AP is an open, efficient, scalable news distribution platform. We're enabling newspapers to benefit for the first time from the disruptive power of the Web, and from the efficiency of content production on the Web."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-25 22:31

Dell has unveiled its small tablet device, the Streak, which is expected to compete against Apple's iPad, PC World reported today.

The Android-based Streak's display is about half the size of the iPad's, and could be of interest especially to business professionals; however, for many, it may be a little too much like "just another Android smartphone," PC World's Tony Brandley wrote.

The Streak can double as a mobile phone, and also have a front-facing camera to enable video-conferencing, thus making it attractive to business travelers who don't want to be weighed down with multiple devices.

"It's portable and mobile. You can put it in your pocket," IDC analyst Will Stofega, who has tried the device, told Reuters. "It is interesting and infinitely usable." However, he noted, Dell's ability to sell millions of the device will be based on pricing and whether the gadget "does what it's supposed to."

Kaufman Bros. Analyst Shaw Wu told the Wall Street Journal he thinks Dell may be looking to enter the tablet market at a lower price point and lower production costs than the iPad.

The Streak will be available at O2 stores and other outlets in early June in the United Kingdom, and later in the summer in the United States.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-25 22:17

When it comes to getting a brand message to the public, growing digital spaces, like social media, are exciting new channels, and using them correctly is important - "correctly" being the key word, a new campaign by Sweden's Dagens Industri points out.

The newspaper, Scandinavia's largest business daily, has created a "cautionary tale" of what can happen when a media outlet works too hard to deliver brand messages on just one platform, the Newspaper Marketing Agency Ltd. reported. Dagens Industri's video, posted on YouTube, is an entertaining take on how to keep it all in perspective.

To watch the video on the Dagens Industri site, click here.
To watch it on YouTube, click here.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-25 19:43

The new Times and Sunday Times websites were launched today, offering a free preview for about a month before going behind a paywall in June. Already, users must register to go beyond the homepage.

As reported last week, the home pages of the new websites look more like their print counterparts and have a stronger multimedia focus. The Sunday Times in particular puts much emphasis on multimedia, leading the homepage with a large photo/video box and accompanying each story with a picture, as well as offering an index of multimedia galleries high up on the page. "We hope we've designed a site that focuses on showcasing that journalism in the cleanest and aesthetically pleasing way possible," said a Times staff member in a live chat.

For more on this story visit our sister publication, editorsweblog.org.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-25 17:46

In 2008, U.S. newspapers saw their online segment grow to approximately US$3.3 billion, 5 percent more than in 2007. This is the first time since 2001 that single-digit average growth has been recorded, and at the local level results were very uneven, SFN's World Digital Media Trends 2009 reported.

The growth in newspaper online revenues has, on any reckoning, been impressive.

At the end of 2008, interactive spending held an 11.5 percent share of all local ad spending. The last Borrell Associates research suggests that it is headed for a 15 percent to 18 percent share before levelling off within five years. If it reaches 18 percent, it will become the second-largest shareholder of local advertising, behind newspapers, according to the report, World Digital Media Trends 2009, released by SFN and the World Association of Newspapers and News Publishers.

Author

Erina Lin

Date

2010-05-24 22:52

Thanks in large part to Apple's iPad, industrywide tablet computer shipments are expected to grow sixfold by 2014, research firm IDC announced in a report, out today.

Shipments around the globe are predicted to increase from 7.6 million this year, to 46 million in 2014, according to the report, Bloomberg Businessweek reported. The Massachusetts-based IDC stated it expects 398 million tablet devices will ship in 2014.

The report also noted that sales of the devices will likely be driven by the number of third-party apps available for download on the tablets.

The annual 57.4 percent growth will also be due to the maturing of the devices in the marketplace; IDC stated that tablets will go from being viewed as "niche luxury devices to necessities for many consumers," MediaPost reported.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-24 22:00

The London Evening Standard today announced the availability of its mobile phone news application in association with mobile apps developer and distributor Handmark, a press release posted on BusinessWire.com announced today.

As newspapers continue to go behind paywalls, the move by the London free daily is aimed at bringing back its lost readership and increasing its subscriptions, by making the news app available on Java and Windows Mobile-compatible versions, ITProPortal.com reported.

The mobile news application is sponsored by British Airways London City service, and can be downloaded for free across a wide range of mobile platforms that include iPhone, Nokia S60, BlackBerry and Google Android smartphones, MediaWeek.co.uk reported.

"We are excited to introduce our new mobile application so our readers can now enjoy the convenience of having instant access to our trusted news and information on the go," Tim Smith, General Manager Digital of the London Evening Standard stated in the press release. "The mobile application provides an extremely intuitive, personalized experience and supports a great sharing experience."

Author

Savita Sauvin

Date

2010-05-24 21:54

Thanks to its commercial division, which produces TV programmes such as Doctor Who and The Office, BBC Worldwide hit record profits of about £140 million for 2009/10, MediaGuardian reported.

BBC Magazines, also part of the group's commercial division, is selling one million copies a week of its Radio Times. Meanwhile, licensing of brands to toy-makers, as well as producing U.S. television hit Dancing with the Stars, and owning TV channels like BBC America, are all causes for record profits. Versions of Dancing with the Stars (known in Britain as Strictly Come Dancing) has been sold to 30 countries, and versions of The Weakest Link are shown in 60 countries worldwide.

Author

Leah McBride Mensching

Date

2010-05-24 20:15


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